Neverfail's North American ruminations.

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Mr. Perfect
Posts: 60
Joined: Sat Jan 07, 2017 11:24 pm

Re: Neverfail's North American ruminations.

Post by Mr. Perfect » Wed Jun 13, 2018 5:27 pm

neverfail wrote:
Wed Jun 13, 2018 3:35 pm
In agreement with you there Sertorio. I consider the (by now long lived) constitutionally ordained system of checks and balances against the abuse of power by incumbent governments to be better than no checks and balances at all. What is wrong is that it is such a crude, imbecile arrangement that it frequently brings about that "gridlock" scenario between the executive and legislative wings of their government that American internet colleagues have been at pains to describe to me. The outcome is that the US system (government and civil society alike) is well neigh unreformable.
It's being reformed right now. It's going great. I guess we all agree now that obama was an enormous failure.
The US representative system of government is based upon the supposition that "government is at best a necessary evil, so better to keep government as small as possible".
I wish. But I've always loved the police and military.
That doctrine precludes the notion that government can be a positive force in society. So US society routinely looks to private enterprise ("free enterprise" as they deem it there) to achieve the positive results that they perceive government incapable of doing.
I think private companies are better at making cars, computers, food, houses, etc.

What do you think.
At this point, Sertorio, you may better comprehend the basis for that preponderance of commercial greed you and I can both detect over there. They are (figuratively) "worshipping at the shrine of a false god". It also helps explain why "socialism" is a dirty word in the US: they equate socialism with the encroachment of 'big government" on their cherished liberties (which presumably includes the freedom to make pots of money).
So when you go to work do you forego getting paid? Do you work for free?
Please also be aware that even if you were somehow to change their system of government for the better, that would not necessarily by itself expunge the by now centuries old habit of pursuing the almighty dollar.
Do you know of a country where people don't work for money?
More likely the new system would be twisted around to comply with the demands of civil society to the point where it resembled the old system it superseded.

Unlike Europeans, who seem to regard social class (and class interests) as a fixed and permanent reality of life, Americans do not normally think in terms of class but view themselves as a fluid society of rugged individualists living in a land of opportunity where even the most humble , as long as he is ambitious enough; applies his energies and talents diligently enough to the task, can still carve out a respectable fortune for himself and therefore rise in social status even to the very heights.
And it's totally awesome. Except in Democrat areas.

neverfail
Posts: 1875
Joined: Sun Dec 18, 2016 3:47 am

Re: Neverfail's North American ruminations.

Post by neverfail » Thu Jun 14, 2018 1:36 am

Mr. Perfect wrote:
Wed Jun 13, 2018 5:27 pm
neverfail wrote:
Wed Jun 13, 2018 3:35 pm
In agreement with you there Sertorio. I consider the (by now long lived) constitutionally ordained system of checks and balances against the abuse of power by incumbent governments to be better than no checks and balances at all. What is wrong is that it is such a crude, imbecile arrangement that it frequently brings about that "gridlock" scenario between the executive and legislative wings of their government that American internet colleagues have been at pains to describe to me. The outcome is that the US system (government and civil society alike) is well neigh unreformable.
It's being reformed right now. It's going great. I guess we all agree now that obama was an enormous failure.
The US representative system of government is based upon the supposition that "government is at best a necessary evil, so better to keep government as small as possible".
I wish. But I've always loved the police and military.
That doctrine precludes the notion that government can be a positive force in society. So US society routinely looks to private enterprise ("free enterprise" as they deem it there) to achieve the positive results that they perceive government incapable of doing.
I think private companies are better at making cars, computers, food, houses, etc.

What do you think.
At this point, Sertorio, you may better comprehend the basis for that preponderance of commercial greed you and I can both detect over there. They are (figuratively) "worshipping at the shrine of a false god". It also helps explain why "socialism" is a dirty word in the US: they equate socialism with the encroachment of 'big government" on their cherished liberties (which presumably includes the freedom to make pots of money).
So when you go to work do you forego getting paid? Do you work for free?
Please also be aware that even if you were somehow to change their system of government for the better, that would not necessarily by itself expunge the by now centuries old habit of pursuing the almighty dollar.
Do you know of a country where people don't work for money?
More likely the new system would be twisted around to comply with the demands of civil society to the point where it resembled the old system it superseded.

Unlike Europeans, who seem to regard social class (and class interests) as a fixed and permanent reality of life, Americans do not normally think in terms of class but view themselves as a fluid society of rugged individualists living in a land of opportunity where even the most humble , as long as he is ambitious enough; applies his energies and talents diligently enough to the task, can still carve out a respectable fortune for himself and therefore rise in social status even to the very heights.
And it's totally awesome. Except in Democrat areas.
:( You just don't get it, Mr Perfect, do you?

neverfail
Posts: 1875
Joined: Sun Dec 18, 2016 3:47 am

Re: Neverfail's North American ruminations.

Post by neverfail » Thu Jun 14, 2018 5:37 pm

:o What, no reply to my most recent post on New York City?

:? It must have stunned them all. :lol:

Manhatten Island = crass worldly ambition driven by Ashkenazi passion ?

:idea: Well, enough of New York. Now on to other matters.

Mr. Perfect wrote:
Wed Jun 13, 2018 3:12 pm
California is full of wastelands of deteriorated tract housing and leads the country in poverty and homelessness. It's also heavily segregated along racial lines in terms of neighborhoods.
Well, we saw none of this Mr Perfect. But of course as we were on vacation and like any sane group of holiday makers avoided places like that. People like us normally seek enjoyment; not causes to feel depressed.

I know from my past visits that such places exist. Indeed I could recount two rather threatening experiences I and my young woman travelling companion had in Greater LA respectively with 1. a black ghetto and 2. Latino (probably Mexican) youth. But I will not recount them in detail here.

"Segregated along racial lines" you say? There are no laws on the California statutes I am aware of that compel people of different races to live in seperate neighbourhoods. California is after all not the deep South back in the days of Jim Crow. So I can only conclude that it must be a case of ethnic segregation by choice. You know - birds of a feather flock together?

The point is that dilapidated housing and ethnic ghettos are nothing new in Los Angeles and even in the San Francisco Bay area. They were there during my first visit back in 1978 - 40 years ago this very month. Now in the interim as well as Democrats state government California has experienced Republican state governments as well. The most celebrated was probably the governorship of Ronald Reagan in the years before he moved on to become US President in 1980. If, as you seem to insinuate, Republican administrations are always oh-so-superior to Democrats ones in matters of public policy, then why did not one (or several) of those solve the problem of substandard housing and racially segregated neighbourhoods while it/they were in government and presumably had a chance to change things for the better?

Is it possible that in the case of Greater LA the problems are so intractable that no government, at least at state level, has the powers to resolve them?

One of the pleasant surprises that greeted me in the United States wherever we went were the blacks. The ones we met all came across as relaxed, courteous and now very much full citizens of the country that they are part of - instead of behaving like members of an alienated sub-group like in days of yore. When I was in the US in the late 1970's racial tensions were still so strong as to be downright palpable. Probably this was a flow-on consequence of the great upheaval of the latter 1960's that erupted during the vexed presidency of Lyndon Baines Johnson. It took America many years afterwards to finally settle down again.

Now however, from our observation, black and white Americans seem to be perfectly relaxed and at home in one another's company. In many significant ways America has not changed in the past 40 years but in terms of race relations I can confidently say that it has - for the better.

I am glad of that. It made our recent stay in the United States so much more pleasant. :D

Jim the Moron
Posts: 801
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Re: Neverfail's North American ruminations.

Post by Jim the Moron » Thu Jun 14, 2018 5:59 pm

"Manhattan Island = crass worldly ambition driven by Ashkenazi passion?" (neverfail)
One thing I noticed during my only visit to Australia - a distinct languor among the passive population that could no doubt benefit from a shot of "Ashkenazi passion."

Mr. Perfect
Posts: 60
Joined: Sat Jan 07, 2017 11:24 pm

Re: Neverfail's North American ruminations.

Post by Mr. Perfect » Thu Jun 14, 2018 8:06 pm

neverfail, you have no idea how much you sound like a tourist.

neverfail
Posts: 1875
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Re: Neverfail's North American ruminations.

Post by neverfail » Thu Jun 14, 2018 11:04 pm

Mr. Perfect wrote:
Thu Jun 14, 2018 8:06 pm
neverfail, you have no idea how much you sound like a tourist.
Well, at least I don't pull any punches.

neverfail
Posts: 1875
Joined: Sun Dec 18, 2016 3:47 am

Re: Neverfail's North American ruminations.

Post by neverfail » Thu Jun 14, 2018 11:08 pm

Jim the Moron wrote:
Thu Jun 14, 2018 5:59 pm
"Manhattan Island = crass worldly ambition driven by Ashkenazi passion?" (neverfail)
One thing I noticed during my only visit to Australia - a distinct languor among the passive population that could no doubt benefit from a shot of "Ashkenazi passion."
"A distinct languor" you say? You only visited Melbourne but I won't contradict you there.

We have the reputation for being a rather laid back people. Possibly the most laid back of all western peoples; certainly within the english language bloc of countries. It does absolutely no harm for the overall quality of life that we enjoy out here. :P

neverfail
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Joined: Sun Dec 18, 2016 3:47 am

Re: Neverfail's North American ruminations.

Post by neverfail » Sat Jun 16, 2018 8:12 pm

https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal ... 4zlvr.html

(quoted headline.) Australia vulnerable to 'full-blown trade war' as US-China tension deepens.

Of course we are. As Trump continues his campaign of grandstanding to his many equally clueless supporters over international trade, he apparently has no consideration of the flow-on impact his male-macho posturing is having on the fortunes of even old and loyal allies like my country.

It is not only China. Trump wanted to impose similar tariffs on imports of steel and aluminium from Canada and Mexico; until it seems wiser heads within his administration persuaded him to exempt America's NAFTA trading partners from the impost.
...........................................................................................................................

Even that is a big improvement on the way in which George Bush Jr. dealt with Canada back in 2002; when as president he unilaterally imposed a ban on imports of timber (lumber, to use North American jargon to define thuis commodity) from Canada against both the letter and spirit of the NAFTA free trade agreement.

Ostensibly the ban was to "protect" US lumber producers. Of course that was a duplicitous, bullshit cover story. The real reason was to reward the US lumber companies with windfall profits in return for a lavish donation to his 2000 electioneering slush fund (as was well known then and now).

A few weeks ago whilst crossing the Canadian Rockies I mentioned this to our well informed coach captain who then went on to describe how it rebounded against the United States. Quite apart from raising the cost of timber in the US (which hurt their building construction industry with increased costs) 'it temporarily devastated the Canadian timber industry, which mass layoffs of workers.'

'However, ironically, it prompted our lumber firms to look for third country markets overseas where they found willing buyers. So the Canadian industry quickly recovered. Then after about 10 months (long enough for the American lumber firms to get their massive windfall profits at cost to the rest of American society) the US government finally lifted the ban with the result that the US could import Canadian softwood again. But they now had to pay a higher price for it. Since Canada had found alternative markets for it they no longer needed sales to the US as much as before and could now demand (and get) higher prices from US buyers.'

(as an aside; I get the impression that Canadian producers, not just of timber either, are so hooked on selling on the US market that for years they have overlooked beconning opportunities for increased sales elsewhere abroad. It took the US ban to goad their timber firms into looking into this.)

(He went on) 'We (Canada) even took them to the international court of justice over the ban and got a ruling in our favour. But the Bush administration just ignored the ruling.'

The hubris, the arrogance of that administration is just breathtaking to behold. In its hypocrisy it placed the United States and itself above international law whilst binding foreign countries abroad, smaller and weaker than itself, to adhere to it.

You never need wonder where global anti-Americanism comes from.

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Sertorio
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Re: Neverfail's North American ruminations.

Post by Sertorio » Sun Jun 17, 2018 3:01 am

neverfail wrote:
Sat Jun 16, 2018 8:12 pm

You never need wonder where global anti-Americanism comes from.
Indeed. Hopefully the world may now be better equipped to put the leash on the beast...

neverfail
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Joined: Sun Dec 18, 2016 3:47 am

Re: Neverfail's North American ruminations.

Post by neverfail » Sun Jun 17, 2018 3:18 am

Sertorio wrote:
Sun Jun 17, 2018 3:01 am
neverfail wrote:
Sat Jun 16, 2018 8:12 pm

You never need wonder where global anti-Americanism comes from.
Indeed. Hopefully the world may now be better equipped to put the leash on the beast...
I don't think so Sertorio. A US president has only limited powers. Constitutional limitations; the division of powers between executive and legislature and between the Federal and states means that the experience of being a POTUS must be quite exasperating quite often. Unfortunately, the particular powers he does have at his command can be used in quite a devastating manner.

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