ISIS on the run under Trump

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Milo
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Re: religious beliefs can be surprisingly resilient.

Post by Milo » Sun Oct 22, 2017 11:10 pm

Doc wrote:
Sun Oct 22, 2017 9:15 pm
Milo wrote:
Sun Oct 22, 2017 7:08 pm
neverfail wrote:
Sun Oct 22, 2017 4:37 pm
70 years of unrelenting atheist propaganda against Christianity and all other forms of religious belief in the Soviet Union failed to disprove the mystery of the holy trinity. Christianity is currently undergoing a big revival within the Russian Federation.

Do you believe that it will be any easier proving to Muslims that Mohammad was really God's prophet?
Cass has a point I think: Islam is tied to territory and no place more so than Mecca.

I think a more effective move would be to carpet bomb Mecca with pig fat.

Butt either way, troops are a waste of resources, especially when you have such cheap alternatives. And when virtually all of the missions involve protecting Muslims who only want to kill or convert us, from other Muslims who feel exactly the same way! And the 'protecting strategic reserves of hydrocarbons' argument is wearing a bit thin at a $2 trillion or so price tag; that could buy a lot of solar panels!

But, of course, the enormous expense supports an enormous web of political patronage and jobs, most of which goes to otherwise unemployable ass clowns. As a matter of fact that sort of never ending boondoggle is pretty much what the ME economy itself, such that it is, consists of.

It would be very beneficial to leave entirely but I'm afraid I don't see that as politically feasible.

One thing I would add to consider

https://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/07/ ... 47635.html
Reported ISIS Member Says They Will Destroy The Kaaba In Mecca, 'Kill Those Who Worship Stones'
I expect us to spend another trillion or so to stop them.

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cassowary
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Re: ISIS on the run under Trump

Post by cassowary » Mon Oct 23, 2017 6:10 am

I think it is fake news Doc. No Muslim will go for this.

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Doc
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Re: religious beliefs can be surprisingly resilient.

Post by Doc » Mon Oct 23, 2017 7:16 am

Milo wrote:
Sun Oct 22, 2017 11:10 pm
Doc wrote:
Sun Oct 22, 2017 9:15 pm
Milo wrote:
Sun Oct 22, 2017 7:08 pm
neverfail wrote:
Sun Oct 22, 2017 4:37 pm
70 years of unrelenting atheist propaganda against Christianity and all other forms of religious belief in the Soviet Union failed to disprove the mystery of the holy trinity. Christianity is currently undergoing a big revival within the Russian Federation.

Do you believe that it will be any easier proving to Muslims that Mohammad was really God's prophet?
Cass has a point I think: Islam is tied to territory and no place more so than Mecca.

I think a more effective move would be to carpet bomb Mecca with pig fat.

Butt either way, troops are a waste of resources, especially when you have such cheap alternatives. And when virtually all of the missions involve protecting Muslims who only want to kill or convert us, from other Muslims who feel exactly the same way! And the 'protecting strategic reserves of hydrocarbons' argument is wearing a bit thin at a $2 trillion or so price tag; that could buy a lot of solar panels!

But, of course, the enormous expense supports an enormous web of political patronage and jobs, most of which goes to otherwise unemployable ass clowns. As a matter of fact that sort of never ending boondoggle is pretty much what the ME economy itself, such that it is, consists of.

It would be very beneficial to leave entirely but I'm afraid I don't see that as politically feasible.

One thing I would add to consider

https://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/07/ ... 47635.html
Reported ISIS Member Says They Will Destroy The Kaaba In Mecca, 'Kill Those Who Worship Stones'
I expect us to spend another trillion or so to stop them.
My point is the question Who among Muslims is the target audience? And Who among Muslims would be collateral damage from the western perspective?.
“"I fancied myself as some kind of god....It is a sort of disease when you consider yourself some kind of god, the creator of everything, but I feel comfortable about it now since I began to live it out.” -- George Soros

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SteveFoerster
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Re: religious beliefs can be surprisingly resilient.

Post by SteveFoerster » Mon Oct 23, 2017 7:25 am

Milo wrote:
Sun Oct 22, 2017 7:08 pm
And the 'protecting strategic reserves of hydrocarbons' argument is wearing a bit thin at a $2 trillion or so price tag; that could buy a lot of solar panels!
It's not about oil, it's about the petrodollar, and how that system makes the USD the world's reserve currency.
Writer, technologist, educator, gadfly.
President of New World University: http://newworld.ac

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cassowary
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Re: religious beliefs can be surprisingly resilient.

Post by cassowary » Tue Oct 31, 2017 5:00 pm

SteveFoerster wrote:
Mon Oct 23, 2017 7:25 am
Milo wrote:
Sun Oct 22, 2017 7:08 pm
And the 'protecting strategic reserves of hydrocarbons' argument is wearing a bit thin at a $2 trillion or so price tag; that could buy a lot of solar panels!
It's not about oil, it's about the petrodollar, and how that system makes the USD the world's reserve currency.
No Steve. That is not true. Here is the refutation of the petrodollar theory.

http://foreignpolicy.com/2009/10/07/deb ... onspiracy/.

I would like to add another obvious reason why pricing oil in whatever currency has little impact on the US economy.

What happens after an oil producer, say Saudi Arabia, receives $ for its oil? It does not have to keep it in dollars. The Saudis may want to pay for imports of German cars say. So it has to convert to Euros. Or it may want to buy Japanese stocks. It has to convert some of their $ into ¥.

This will lower demand for US $. So the idea that pricing oil in $ pushes up demand for $ allowing the US to borrow cheaply is false.

But what happens if oil is priced in say Euros? Will Saudi Arabia keep it in Euros? No! It may want to buy Boeing planes. Or it may wish to buy US real estate. So it needs to sell Euros and buy $. So ultimately, the strength of the US $ depends on the attractiveness of its products and investment assets.

neverfail
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Re: it does not end there.

Post by neverfail » Tue Oct 31, 2017 6:15 pm

cassowary wrote:
Tue Oct 31, 2017 5:00 pm


What happens after an oil producer, say Saudi Arabia, receives $ for its oil? It does not have to keep it in dollars. The Saudis may want to pay for imports of German cars say. So it has to convert to Euros. Or it may want to buy Japanese stocks. It has to convert some of their $ into ¥.

So the Saudis have changed their Petrodollars for Euros! What then? Well, the European Central Bank in Frankfurt then sends these over to the FED in (New York; Washington?) where it becomes part of the EU reserves in the purchase of bonds (i.e. they buy up US government debt). The Japanese central bank sends those dollars to the same destination with the same result - allowing government in the US to spend way beyond its tax receipts adding further to US debt; also permitting US interest rates to remain artificially low (and co-incidentally giving US citizens a big disincentive to save money given the low interest they are paid for the money they do save).

The US is like a junkie who dreads being deprived of his heroin. He fears the suffering he will endure should he have to do without.

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cassowary
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Re: it does not end there.

Post by cassowary » Wed Nov 01, 2017 1:01 am

neverfail wrote:
Tue Oct 31, 2017 6:15 pm
cassowary wrote:
Tue Oct 31, 2017 5:00 pm


What happens after an oil producer, say Saudi Arabia, receives $ for its oil? It does not have to keep it in dollars. The Saudis may want to pay for imports of German cars say. So it has to convert to Euros. Or it may want to buy Japanese stocks. It has to convert some of their $ into ¥.

So the Saudis have changed their Petrodollars for Euros! What then? Well, the European Central Bank in Frankfurt then sends these over to the FED in (New York; Washington?) where it becomes part of the EU reserves in the purchase of bonds (i.e. they buy up US government debt). The Japanese central bank sends those dollars to the same destination with the same result - allowing government in the US to spend way beyond its tax receipts adding further to US debt; also permitting US interest rates to remain artificially low (and co-incidentally giving US citizens a big disincentive to save money given the low interest they are paid for the money they do save).

The US is like a junkie who dreads being deprived of his heroin. He fears the suffering he will endure should he have to do without.
It is the choice of the EU Central Bank to buy US Bonds. They could and do buy European and Japanese bonds. It's just that they, for some reason, find US bonds attractive. So it still comes down to the attractiveness of US goods and assets. Nothing to do with the Petrodollar.

neverfail
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Re: it does not end there.

Post by neverfail » Wed Nov 01, 2017 3:31 am

cassowary wrote:
Wed Nov 01, 2017 1:01 am
neverfail wrote:
Tue Oct 31, 2017 6:15 pm
cassowary wrote:
Tue Oct 31, 2017 5:00 pm


What happens after an oil producer, say Saudi Arabia, receives $ for its oil? It does not have to keep it in dollars. The Saudis may want to pay for imports of German cars say. So it has to convert to Euros. Or it may want to buy Japanese stocks. It has to convert some of their $ into ¥.

So the Saudis have changed their Petrodollars for Euros! What then? Well, the European Central Bank in Frankfurt then sends these over to the FED in (New York; Washington?) where it becomes part of the EU reserves in the purchase of bonds (i.e. they buy up US government debt). The Japanese central bank sends those dollars to the same destination with the same result - allowing government in the US to spend way beyond its tax receipts adding further to US debt; also permitting US interest rates to remain artificially low (and co-incidentally giving US citizens a big disincentive to save money given the low interest they are paid for the money they do save).

The US is like a junkie who dreads being deprived of his heroin. He fears the suffering he will endure should he have to do without.
It is the choice of the EU Central Bank to buy US Bonds. They could and do buy European and Japanese bonds. It's just that they, for some reason, find US bonds attractive. So it still comes down to the attractiveness of US goods and assets. Nothing to do with the Petrodollar.
Considering the negligable interest rate they now get as a return on investment, I do not think so cass.

The "attraction" is simply that it is better for them to do that rather than holding on indefinitely to otherwise useless wads of US dollars as dead money.

The added attraction for Japan and Germany (currency manipulators from way back) is that it boosts the 4x value of the greenback thereby making the US a softer target for their exports - allowing them to continue running their traditional trade surpluses. :)

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cassowary
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Re: it does not end there.

Post by cassowary » Wed Nov 01, 2017 3:52 am

neverfail wrote:
Wed Nov 01, 2017 3:31 am
cassowary wrote:
Wed Nov 01, 2017 1:01 am
neverfail wrote:
Tue Oct 31, 2017 6:15 pm
cassowary wrote:
Tue Oct 31, 2017 5:00 pm


What happens after an oil producer, say Saudi Arabia, receives $ for its oil? It does not have to keep it in dollars. The Saudis may want to pay for imports of German cars say. So it has to convert to Euros. Or it may want to buy Japanese stocks. It has to convert some of their $ into ¥.

So the Saudis have changed their Petrodollars for Euros! What then? Well, the European Central Bank in Frankfurt then sends these over to the FED in (New York; Washington?) where it becomes part of the EU reserves in the purchase of bonds (i.e. they buy up US government debt). The Japanese central bank sends those dollars to the same destination with the same result - allowing government in the US to spend way beyond its tax receipts adding further to US debt; also permitting US interest rates to remain artificially low (and co-incidentally giving US citizens a big disincentive to save money given the low interest they are paid for the money they do save).

The US is like a junkie who dreads being deprived of his heroin. He fears the suffering he will endure should he have to do without.
It is the choice of the EU Central Bank to buy US Bonds. They could and do buy European and Japanese bonds. It's just that they, for some reason, find US bonds attractive. So it still comes down to the attractiveness of US goods and assets. Nothing to do with the Petrodollar.
Considering the negligable interest rate they now get as a return on investment, I do not think so cass.

The "attraction" is simply that it is better for them to do that rather than holding on indefinitely to otherwise useless wads of US dollars as dead money.

The added attraction for Japan and Germany (currency manipulators from way back) is that it boosts the 4x value of the greenback thereby making the US a softer target for their exports - allowing them to continue running their traditional trade surpluses. :)
That is the most likely explanation why Germany, Japan and China buy US bonds. They want to export more stuff to the US by lending them money. They are all lending money to the Americans so that the Americans can continue to buy from them. While the Americans are addicted to debt, the exporters are addicted to the US market. Both sides deserve each other.

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Sertorio
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Re: ISIS on the run under Trump

Post by Sertorio » Tue Nov 28, 2017 2:58 am

SDF, the mostly Kurdish allies of the US led coalition in Syria, has signed an agreement with ISIS which may indicate how ISIS is enjoying the protection of the US:

Image

https://southfront.org/text-of-alleged- ... ed-online/

This shows the American duplicity in the whole Syrian affair. In the end both US troops and its allies will be either expelled from Syria or militarily defeated, but meanwhile innocent people are being killed by the warmongers, and the terrorists are being kept active for the benefit of the twisted US foreign policy.

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