Singapore looks to Malaysia (for a change).

Discussion of current events
Post Reply
neverfail
Posts: 2497
Joined: Sun Dec 18, 2016 3:47 am

Singapore looks to Malaysia (for a change).

Post by neverfail » Thu Aug 09, 2018 11:37 pm

http://www.atimes.com/article/looking-t ... -together/

Ex-MP Tan Cheng Bock's new alliance aims to replicate Malaysia's opposition election win to depose Singapore's long-ruling People's Action Party

So what do you think cassowary? Possibility of a change of government in the coming years?

User avatar
cassowary
Posts: 2287
Joined: Thu Dec 15, 2016 11:30 pm

Re: Singapore looks to Malaysia (for a change).

Post by cassowary » Sat Aug 11, 2018 8:35 am

neverfail wrote:
Thu Aug 09, 2018 11:37 pm
http://www.atimes.com/article/looking-t ... -together/

Ex-MP Tan Cheng Bock's new alliance aims to replicate Malaysia's opposition election win to depose Singapore's long-ruling People's Action Party

So what do you think cassowary? Possibility of a change of government in the coming years?
It is inevitable. But I think it is a long while yet. There is no scandal here like the 1MBD scandal in Malaysia where the PM Najib was found with a deposit of US$700 million in his personal account.

neverfail
Posts: 2497
Joined: Sun Dec 18, 2016 3:47 am

Re: Singapore looks to Malaysia (for a change).

Post by neverfail » Sat Aug 11, 2018 3:39 pm

Thanks Cassowary. As you are the man in the box seat I was looking forward to reading your reply.

Singapore seems to run itself as an honest shop. Given that I imagine it would be difficult even for a well organised Opposition to unseat a tried and proven government.

User avatar
cassowary
Posts: 2287
Joined: Thu Dec 15, 2016 11:30 pm

Re: Singapore looks to Malaysia (for a change).

Post by cassowary » Sat Aug 11, 2018 10:28 pm

neverfail wrote:
Sat Aug 11, 2018 3:39 pm
Thanks Cassowary. As you are the man in the box seat I was looking forward to reading your reply.

Singapore seems to run itself as an honest shop. Given that I imagine it would be difficult even for a well organised Opposition to unseat a tried and proven government.
Not only that. The main opposition party, the Workers' Party, is ignoring Tan Cheng Bok.
It is unclear if the proposed coalition will include Singapore's two biggest opposition parties - the Workers' Party (WP) and the Singapore People's Party (SPP). Both were invited to the meeting but did not go.
Thus, if this Alliance does materialize, it is an alliance of losers and no-hopers who have little chance of winning a seat. Cheng Bok is 78 and by his own admission has only a "small window of opportunity" to make an impact. Nothing will come out of it.

Background
Cheng Bok is peeved at being disqualified from competing in the election of the President a largely ceremonial post.

The PM LHL decided it was the turn for a Malay Muslim to hold the Presidency to better reflect the ethnic composition of Singapore. Prior to the Presidential election of 2017, there was only one Malay Muslim President out of six. But most people agree that a Malay Muslim will not win in an open election against a reputable Chinese like Cheng Bock.

So Parliament conveniently passed a law allowing a limited election where only a Malay Muslim can compete.

This move is popular with the Malay Muslim community though there are grumblings from the Chinese majority. My guess is that the ruling party wants to win votes from them. There had been a spike of Malay Muslims joining ISIS and planning mayhem in Singapore. The community is economically behind the Chinese and Indians (as usual. I blame Islam.) So now that we got Halimah Yacob as the President, let's hope they will be kept happy.

Post Reply