Additive Manufacturing (3d printing)

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Milo
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Additive Manufacturing (3d printing)

Post by Milo » Tue Jan 03, 2017 11:54 pm

IMO, the hype around AM is on the verge of being justified.

HP has just unveiled a printer that is competitive with injection moulding processes.

https://youtu.be/XeTdo-w6Qx8

Nano now has a printer for PCB prototyping.

https://youtu.be/S7G-IaYxg9E

In general, this technology appears to be advancing at a pace that can soon replace any manufacturing process. The implications are staggering.

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dagbay
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Re: Additive Manufacturing (3d printing)

Post by dagbay » Fri Jan 06, 2017 7:32 pm

Any manufacturing process is a streatch! Many processes involve modification to materials on a molecular level. Other processes require surface qualities and voids that are impractical with additive technologies. Materials for this type of manufacturing must be stable enough to be layered to form the product.
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Milo
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Re: Additive Manufacturing (3d printing)

Post by Milo » Fri Jan 06, 2017 10:07 pm

dagbay wrote:Any manufacturing process is a streatch! Many processes involve modification to materials on a molecular level. Other processes require surface qualities and voids that are impractical with additive technologies. Materials for this type of manufacturing must be stable enough to be layered to form the product.

In a new study published in the journal Science today, Burke has announced the specs of a chemistry's own version of the 3D printer—a machine that can systematically synthesize thousands of different molecules (including the ratanhine molecular family) from a handful of starting chemicals. Such a machine could not only make ratanhine step-by-step, but also could custom-create a dozen other closely-related chemicals—some never even synthesized before by humans. That could allow scientists to test the medicinal properties of a whole molecular family.

http://www.popularmechanics.com/science ... m-scratch/

But a team of UK scientists and engineers from the University of Glasgow and BAE Systems are already looking much further than that. They are working on a chemical 3D printer called the Chemputer, which can grow highly advanced and bespoke unmanned aircraft in a matter of weeks.

http://www.3ders.org/articles/20160704- ... rones.html

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Booklady
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Re: Additive Manufacturing (3d printing)

Post by Booklady » Sat Jan 07, 2017 6:03 pm

Milo wrote:
dagbay wrote:Any manufacturing process is a streatch! Many processes involve modification to materials on a molecular level. Other processes require surface qualities and voids that are impractical with additive technologies. Materials for this type of manufacturing must be stable enough to be layered to form the product.

In a new study published in the journal Science today, Burke has announced the specs of a chemistry's own version of the 3D printer—a machine that can systematically synthesize thousands of different molecules (including the ratanhine molecular family) from a handful of starting chemicals. Such a machine could not only make ratanhine step-by-step, but also could custom-create a dozen other closely-related chemicals—some never even synthesized before by humans. That could allow scientists to test the medicinal properties of a whole molecular family.

http://www.popularmechanics.com/science ... m-scratch/

But a team of UK scientists and engineers from the University of Glasgow and BAE Systems are already looking much further than that. They are working on a chemical 3D printer called the Chemputer, which can grow highly advanced and bespoke unmanned aircraft in a matter of weeks.

http://www.3ders.org/articles/20160704- ... rones.html
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lzzrdgrrl
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Re: Additive Manufacturing (3d printing)

Post by lzzrdgrrl » Sat Jan 07, 2017 6:30 pm

Like Pinterest but for people with 3D printers. Check this out:

https://www.thingiverse.com/
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Milo
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Re: Additive Manufacturing (3d printing)

Post by Milo » Sun Apr 15, 2018 3:16 pm

Perhaps the barriers to metal additive manufacturing are falling.

One has to give some attention when literal rocket scientists are throwing their hat in the ring!


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Doc
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Re: Additive Manufacturing (3d printing)

Post by Doc » Sun Apr 15, 2018 3:20 pm

Not additive But wow.... And only $625,000 for three years use.


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Milo
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Re: Additive Manufacturing (3d printing)

Post by Milo » Sun Apr 15, 2018 3:58 pm

Doc wrote:
Sun Apr 15, 2018 3:20 pm
Not additive But wow.... And only $625,000 for three years use.


I would say that it is additive.

But the larger point being that these processes seem poised to disrupt, in industries that require high strength materials.

The potential to derail China's plans is huge if these processes prove out and I see no reason why they won't.

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Re: Additive Manufacturing (3d printing)

Post by Doc » Sun Apr 15, 2018 4:52 pm

Milo wrote:
Sun Apr 15, 2018 3:58 pm
Doc wrote:
Sun Apr 15, 2018 3:20 pm
Not additive But wow.... And only $625,000 for three years use.


I would say that it is additive.

But the larger point being that these processes seem poised to disrupt, in industries that require high strength materials.

The potential to derail China's plans is huge if these processes prove out and I see no reason why they won't.
They do work. Just the cost is high due to only the one company doing it. The unique part is the way they use the chemistry to change the properties of the material. Anyway pretty cool
“"I fancied myself as some kind of god....It is a sort of disease when you consider yourself some kind of god, the creator of everything, but I feel comfortable about it now since I began to live it out.” -- George Soros

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Milo
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Re: Additive Manufacturing (3d printing)

Post by Milo » Thu Jul 05, 2018 8:56 pm

For a more real world example: the world's first inhabited 3d printed house. Of course it's not purely additive but substantially so.



Here's coverage after the movie in.

Is 3D printing the future of social housing? http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-44709534

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