Apparent Miliary coup begining in Brazil

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Sertorio
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Re: Apparent Miliary coup begining in Brazil

Post by Sertorio » Sat Jun 02, 2018 3:39 am

cassowary wrote:
Fri Jun 01, 2018 2:15 pm
Sertorio wrote:
Fri Jun 01, 2018 9:47 am
Neverfail,

I agree with enough of what you wrote not to feel it worthwhile to underline those few things with which I might disagree.

Nevertheless I think it worthwhile to draw your attention to an aspect far too many people seem to disregard. The main problem of Latin America is insufficient development on what schooling and knowledge are concerned. Far too many people are far too ignorant, which makes it almost impossible for them to understand the real problems of their countries, and thus to determine what the best solutions would be. They make electoral choices for all the bad reasons, and then they have to put up with the consequences of their bad choices. Never realizing that their choices were bad in the first place. Uruguayans, who are better educated than most South Americans, are therefore about to escape the traditional fate of Latin American countries. We had very much the same problem in Portugal, which explains our poor performance until shortly ago. It is only now (the last decade or so) that we have reached a level of schooling and access to reliable information to allow us to expect to become more like our more developed partners in Europe.

By the way, Brazil is NOT "a country that has oil to sell and nothing much else going for it on the economic front"...
Does that mean that Portugal has now embraced capitalism?
You should stop that obsession with socialism and capitalism. It prevents you from understanding what is going on in any country. Fundamentalistic attitudes are not good for your (mental) health... :D

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cassowary
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Re: Apparent Miliary coup begining in Brazil

Post by cassowary » Sat Jun 02, 2018 6:28 am

Sertorio wrote:
Sat Jun 02, 2018 3:39 am
cassowary wrote:
Fri Jun 01, 2018 2:15 pm
Sertorio wrote:
Fri Jun 01, 2018 9:47 am
Neverfail,

I agree with enough of what you wrote not to feel it worthwhile to underline those few things with which I might disagree.

Nevertheless I think it worthwhile to draw your attention to an aspect far too many people seem to disregard. The main problem of Latin America is insufficient development on what schooling and knowledge are concerned. Far too many people are far too ignorant, which makes it almost impossible for them to understand the real problems of their countries, and thus to determine what the best solutions would be. They make electoral choices for all the bad reasons, and then they have to put up with the consequences of their bad choices. Never realizing that their choices were bad in the first place. Uruguayans, who are better educated than most South Americans, are therefore about to escape the traditional fate of Latin American countries. We had very much the same problem in Portugal, which explains our poor performance until shortly ago. It is only now (the last decade or so) that we have reached a level of schooling and access to reliable information to allow us to expect to become more like our more developed partners in Europe.

By the way, Brazil is NOT "a country that has oil to sell and nothing much else going for it on the economic front"...
Does that mean that Portugal has now embraced capitalism?
You should stop that obsession with socialism and capitalism. It prevents you from understanding what is going on in any country. Fundamentalistic attitudes are not good for your (mental) health... :D
So what has Portugal done to improve its economy? How has it made its economy more productive?

Did you do more redistribution of wealth or less? Cut taxes or raise them? Raise spending or cut spending?

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Sertorio
Posts: 1834
Joined: Fri Dec 16, 2016 3:12 am

Re: Apparent Miliary coup begining in Brazil

Post by Sertorio » Sat Jun 02, 2018 8:55 am

cassowary wrote:
Sat Jun 02, 2018 6:28 am
Sertorio wrote:
Sat Jun 02, 2018 3:39 am
cassowary wrote:
Fri Jun 01, 2018 2:15 pm
Sertorio wrote:
Fri Jun 01, 2018 9:47 am
Neverfail,

I agree with enough of what you wrote not to feel it worthwhile to underline those few things with which I might disagree.

Nevertheless I think it worthwhile to draw your attention to an aspect far too many people seem to disregard. The main problem of Latin America is insufficient development on what schooling and knowledge are concerned. Far too many people are far too ignorant, which makes it almost impossible for them to understand the real problems of their countries, and thus to determine what the best solutions would be. They make electoral choices for all the bad reasons, and then they have to put up with the consequences of their bad choices. Never realizing that their choices were bad in the first place. Uruguayans, who are better educated than most South Americans, are therefore about to escape the traditional fate of Latin American countries. We had very much the same problem in Portugal, which explains our poor performance until shortly ago. It is only now (the last decade or so) that we have reached a level of schooling and access to reliable information to allow us to expect to become more like our more developed partners in Europe.

By the way, Brazil is NOT "a country that has oil to sell and nothing much else going for it on the economic front"...
Does that mean that Portugal has now embraced capitalism?
You should stop that obsession with socialism and capitalism. It prevents you from understanding what is going on in any country. Fundamentalistic attitudes are not good for your (mental) health... :D
So what has Portugal done to improve its economy? How has it made its economy more productive?

Did you do more redistribution of wealth or less? Cut taxes or raise them? Raise spending or cut spending?
Our economy became more productive through investment and improved skills of both workers and managers. Everything else was of little relevance. I'm sure you will eventually come to realize that this is what truly matters. Not capitalism or socialism...

neverfail
Posts: 2577
Joined: Sun Dec 18, 2016 3:47 am

Re: Apparent Miliary coup begining in Brazil

Post by neverfail » Sat Jun 02, 2018 12:31 pm

Thanks Sertorio. I have learned something from your "disagreement" and accept your insight.

Brazil indeed has a very broadly based national economy - arguably the most diversified one on the south American continent and is unlikely to degenerate into a petrol state anytime soon.

Venezuela is a different matter. It has (I believe) a wealth of resources (including the sinfully underutilised talents of its people) that it has never bothered to develop but instead has chosen to remain oil dependent. That in my view is a damning indictment of all Venezuelan governments past and present alike.

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cassowary
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Joined: Thu Dec 15, 2016 11:30 pm

Re: Apparent Miliary coup begining in Brazil

Post by cassowary » Sat Jun 02, 2018 2:10 pm

Sertorio wrote:
Sat Jun 02, 2018 8:55 am
cassowary wrote:
Sat Jun 02, 2018 6:28 am
Sertorio wrote:
Sat Jun 02, 2018 3:39 am
cassowary wrote:
Fri Jun 01, 2018 2:15 pm
Sertorio wrote:
Fri Jun 01, 2018 9:47 am
Neverfail,

I agree with enough of what you wrote not to feel it worthwhile to underline those few things with which I might disagree.

Nevertheless I think it worthwhile to draw your attention to an aspect far too many people seem to disregard. The main problem of Latin America is insufficient development on what schooling and knowledge are concerned. Far too many people are far too ignorant, which makes it almost impossible for them to understand the real problems of their countries, and thus to determine what the best solutions would be. They make electoral choices for all the bad reasons, and then they have to put up with the consequences of their bad choices. Never realizing that their choices were bad in the first place. Uruguayans, who are better educated than most South Americans, are therefore about to escape the traditional fate of Latin American countries. We had very much the same problem in Portugal, which explains our poor performance until shortly ago. It is only now (the last decade or so) that we have reached a level of schooling and access to reliable information to allow us to expect to become more like our more developed partners in Europe.

By the way, Brazil is NOT "a country that has oil to sell and nothing much else going for it on the economic front"...
Does that mean that Portugal has now embraced capitalism?
You should stop that obsession with socialism and capitalism. It prevents you from understanding what is going on in any country. Fundamentalistic attitudes are not good for your (mental) health... :D
So what has Portugal done to improve its economy? How has it made its economy more productive?

Did you do more redistribution of wealth or less? Cut taxes or raise them? Raise spending or cut spending?
Our economy became more productive through investment and improved skills of both workers and managers. Everything else was of little relevance. I'm sure you will eventually come to realize that this is what truly matters. Not capitalism or socialism...
Before businesses invest, they want to know if they will make a profit. So the economic system matters.

Anyway, what if any, are the changes of the economic system in recent years? Cut or raise taxes? Increase or decrease regulations? Cut or increase government spending?

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Milo
Posts: 1432
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Re: Apparent Miliary coup begining in Brazil

Post by Milo » Sat Jun 02, 2018 2:56 pm

Sertorio wrote:
Sat Jun 02, 2018 3:39 am
cassowary wrote:
Fri Jun 01, 2018 2:15 pm
Sertorio wrote:
Fri Jun 01, 2018 9:47 am
Neverfail,

I agree with enough of what you wrote not to feel it worthwhile to underline those few things with which I might disagree.

Nevertheless I think it worthwhile to draw your attention to an aspect far too many people seem to disregard. The main problem of Latin America is insufficient development on what schooling and knowledge are concerned. Far too many people are far too ignorant, which makes it almost impossible for them to understand the real problems of their countries, and thus to determine what the best solutions would be. They make electoral choices for all the bad reasons, and then they have to put up with the consequences of their bad choices. Never realizing that their choices were bad in the first place. Uruguayans, who are better educated than most South Americans, are therefore about to escape the traditional fate of Latin American countries. We had very much the same problem in Portugal, which explains our poor performance until shortly ago. It is only now (the last decade or so) that we have reached a level of schooling and access to reliable information to allow us to expect to become more like our more developed partners in Europe.

By the way, Brazil is NOT "a country that has oil to sell and nothing much else going for it on the economic front"...
Does that mean that Portugal has now embraced capitalism?
You should stop that obsession with socialism and capitalism. It prevents you from understanding what is going on in any country. Fundamentalistic attitudes are not good for your (mental) health... :D
That is probably the smartest thing you have ever said on here.

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cassowary
Posts: 2372
Joined: Thu Dec 15, 2016 11:30 pm

Re: Apparent Miliary coup begining in Brazil

Post by cassowary » Sat Jun 02, 2018 4:09 pm

Milo wrote:
Sat Jun 02, 2018 2:56 pm
Sertorio wrote:
Sat Jun 02, 2018 3:39 am
cassowary wrote:
Fri Jun 01, 2018 2:15 pm
Sertorio wrote:
Fri Jun 01, 2018 9:47 am
Neverfail,

I agree with enough of what you wrote not to feel it worthwhile to underline those few things with which I might disagree.

Nevertheless I think it worthwhile to draw your attention to an aspect far too many people seem to disregard. The main problem of Latin America is insufficient development on what schooling and knowledge are concerned. Far too many people are far too ignorant, which makes it almost impossible for them to understand the real problems of their countries, and thus to determine what the best solutions would be. They make electoral choices for all the bad reasons, and then they have to put up with the consequences of their bad choices. Never realizing that their choices were bad in the first place. Uruguayans, who are better educated than most South Americans, are therefore about to escape the traditional fate of Latin American countries. We had very much the same problem in Portugal, which explains our poor performance until shortly ago. It is only now (the last decade or so) that we have reached a level of schooling and access to reliable information to allow us to expect to become more like our more developed partners in Europe.

By the way, Brazil is NOT "a country that has oil to sell and nothing much else going for it on the economic front"...
Does that mean that Portugal has now embraced capitalism?
You should stop that obsession with socialism and capitalism. It prevents you from understanding what is going on in any country. Fundamentalistic attitudes are not good for your (mental) health... :D
That is probably the smartest thing you have ever said on here.
Sertorio is just trying to avoid a debate that he knows he will lose. That's smart of him, I guess.

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SteveFoerster
Posts: 1616
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Location: Northern Virginia, USA and Dominica, West Indies
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Re: Apparent Miliary coup begining in Brazil

Post by SteveFoerster » Sun Jun 03, 2018 12:47 am

Sertorio wrote:
Sat Jun 02, 2018 3:39 am
Fundamentalistic attitudes are not good for your (mental) health... :D
Says the guy whose anti-American attitudes are so fervent that he will support any regime, however murderous, as a preferred alternative.
Writer, technologist, educator, gadfly.
President of New World University: http://newworld.ac

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Sertorio
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Re: Apparent Miliary coup begining in Brazil

Post by Sertorio » Sun Jun 03, 2018 3:03 am

SteveFoerster wrote:
Sun Jun 03, 2018 12:47 am
Sertorio wrote:
Sat Jun 02, 2018 3:39 am
Fundamentalistic attitudes are not good for your (mental) health... :D
Says the guy whose anti-American attitudes are so fervent that he will support any regime, however murderous, as a preferred alternative.
You are smart enough to have realized that I do not support "any" regime. I support anything which can hinder US warmongering and imperialistic policies. That may mean supporting the North Korean nuclear deterrent, but it doesn't mean supporting Kim Jong-un's regime. But, unpleasant as it is, Kim's regime is a problem to be solved by North Koreans alone.

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cassowary
Posts: 2372
Joined: Thu Dec 15, 2016 11:30 pm

Re: Apparent Miliary coup begining in Brazil

Post by cassowary » Sun Jun 03, 2018 3:28 pm

Sertorio wrote:
Sun Jun 03, 2018 3:03 am
SteveFoerster wrote:
Sun Jun 03, 2018 12:47 am
Sertorio wrote:
Sat Jun 02, 2018 3:39 am
Fundamentalistic attitudes are not good for your (mental) health... :D
Says the guy whose anti-American attitudes are so fervent that he will support any regime, however murderous, as a preferred alternative.
You are smart enough to have realized that I do not support "any" regime. I support anything which can hinder US warmongering and imperialistic policies. That may mean supporting the North Korean nuclear deterrent, but it doesn't mean supporting Kim Jong-un's regime. But, unpleasant as it is, Kim's regime is a problem to be solved by North Koreans alone.
In other words, it won't be solved anytime soon because the N Korean people are in no position to rid itself of a murderous regime.

Your sleight of hand does not fool me. By supporting N Korea's nuclear "deterrent", the result is that you are supporting the N Korean regime. This is what I have noticed. The Left ends up supporting the worst, most murderous regimes. In the 1930s, they supported Stalin. In the 1960s, they supported Ho Chin Minh. In the 1980s, they supported the USSR.

Now you support Fatty Kim.

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