The American War Budget

Discussion of current events
Post Reply
User avatar
Sertorio
Posts: 6198
Joined: Fri Dec 16, 2016 3:12 am

The American War Budget

Post by Sertorio » Sat Jan 01, 2022 4:06 am

Another Nail in the U.S. Empire’s Coffin… Biden Signs $770 Billion War Budget
December 31, 2021
https://www.strategic-culture.org/news/ ... ar-budget/

As this year ends, U.S. President Joe Biden signed into law military spending of $770 billion. That’s just for the next year alone. The scale of wastefulness and bloated corruption is eye-watering. It eclipses what the United States is willing to invest for overhauling its badly neglected civilian infrastructure and for combating the coronavirus pandemic that has killed far more people in the U.S. than in any other nation.

If there is one thing that portends a historic collapse of U.S. global power it is its pathological addiction to militarism that is hemorrhaging vital resources.

What is also amazing is how this gargantuan deformity in economic planning is presented as somehow rational and normal by the Western media.

Three decades after the Cold War officially ended, the U.S. is setting a new record high for annual expenditure on its armed forces.

Biden’s budget – his first as president – exceeds the record set by the previous Trump administration for military largesse of $740 billion.

So much for wishing humanity peace and prosperity – as is the international tradition at this time of year – when the U.S. allocates such a grotesque amount of resources to the means of war and annihilation.

This obscene expenditure is not in any way conceivably a “defense budget” as it is termed in Orwellian newspeak. It is a dreadful and despicable war budget.

The United States spends more on its military than the next 11 top nations combined. Compared with China ($250bn) the U.S. budget is nearly three times bigger. The U.S. spends over 12 times more than Russia ($60bn) on its armed forces.

Those figures alone tell beyond any doubt which nation is the ultimate aggressor. Yet, farcically, the Western corporate media in Orwellian fashion portray China and Russia as the aggressors against whom the United States is “defending’ the rest of the world.

Biden’s 2022 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA), as it is formally titled, devotes billions more to devising new nuclear weapons and to provoke China and Russia. Camouflaged with Orwellian rhetoric, there is some $7 billion for the “Pacific Deterrence Initiative” and $4 billion for the “European Defense Initiative”.

The Biden administration has committed a further $300 million in military support for Ukraine over the next year. This is on top of the $2.5 billion in arms that Washington has plowed into Ukraine since the CIA-backed coup d’état in Kiev in 2014 which brought to power a Russophobic regime.

Next week, U.S. and Russian officials are to hold negotiations in Geneva to deescalate tensions over Ukraine and Europe generally. It is blindingly obvious that the crisis over security has been created by the United States pushing a policy of militarizing Europe against Russia in the form of expanding the NATO alliance all the way to Russia’s borders.

With twisted logic, Moscow is accused of “threatening” Ukraine and European security even though its troops are on Russian soil and it is American weapons that are encroaching on Russia’s territory.

The inordinate military spending by the United States year after year is proof of the source of international tensions.

When the Cold War supposedly ended in 1991 following the demise of the Soviet Union, there was a reasonable expectation around the world for a “peace dividend” to ensue. That is, whereby Cold War militarism would at last give way to peaceful economic development and cooperation. How lamentable the disappointment!

The inescapable fact is that the U.S. economy is a war-driven system. The military-industrial complex at the heart of American capitalism is dependent on massive taxpayer-funded financial subvention. If an economy is driven for war, then it follows that conflicts and wars are inevitable. This is why, 30 years after the supposed end of the Cold War, the United States is closer to starting a war with Russia and China than ever before.

In an insightful interview this week, former United Nations diplomat Alfred Maurice de Zayas condemned what he called the “universal provocation” of the US “war budget”. De Zayas points out that the United States is preeminently guilty of undermining global peace and security. Its relentless militarism compels other nations to spend excessively on defense in order to counter the threat posed by the United States. Both China and Russia have long-proposed multilateralism and “win-win” cooperation. Neither of these nations has threatened the United States. It is always the U.S. with its mixture of paranoia and hubris that constantly portrays others as enemies and existential dangers. Again, that is due to the need for justifying the abomination of American military orgy year after year.

The truth is the United States has been at war against the rest of the world since at least the end of the Second World War. For most of that period, the Cold War, Washington cited the threat of Soviet and Chinese communism. It waged wars in dozens of countries on every continent killing tens of millions of people purportedly in the “defense of democracy and the free world”. How godawful ridiculous is that?

The Cold War was supposed to have ended, yet the U.S. continues its remorseless warmongering. It retreated from Afghanistan this year after two decades of futile war, only to now wind up tensions with Russia and China. The pretexts and excuses change over the decades, but the fundamental story remains the same: the United States is at war with the rest of the world in the vain ambition of exerting hegemonic domination. Arguably, that’s an essential definition of fascism.

But it’s not just against the rest of the world that the U.S. rulers are waging war. They are waging war against their own American citizens. The Washington elite of both parties (comprising the de facto War Party) whistle through a military budget funded by taxpayers that dwarves anything the federal government is prepared to spend on societal infrastructure and decent human development.

Far above any other nation, the U.S. has a pandemic killing nearly 850,000 people so far and there is no end in sight. U.S. rulers refuse to allocate more financial help to the population to defeat the pandemic yet they are planning to spend billions on offensive weapons systems to threaten Russia and China.

The hideously perverse priorities of the United States as demonstrated by its wanton militarism are a portent and ultimate cause of its historic failure. It is a vile disgrace that the apparent solution to its inherent contradictions is to start a catastrophic war. Fortunately, Russia and China are strong enough militarily to not let that happen. And so the outcome we will witness more of over the coming year will be the United States cratering from its own internal corruption.
No need for comments. This is as it is. But some people still haven't understood it.

User avatar
SteveFoerster
Posts: 2712
Joined: Thu Dec 15, 2016 7:17 pm
Location: Probably DCA, YYJ, or DOM
Contact:

Re: The American War Budget

Post by SteveFoerster » Sat Jan 01, 2022 12:24 pm

In the spirit of the new year, I'll overlook the more theatrical parts of that and simply agree with you that the U.S. military budget is ridiculously bloated, and that it's focused on projecting power abroad rather than solely to defend U.S. territory.
Writer, technologist, educator, gadfly.
President of New World University: https://newworld.ac

neverfail
Posts: 7789
Joined: Sun Dec 18, 2016 3:47 am
Location: Singapore

Re: The American War Budget

Post by neverfail » Sat Jan 01, 2022 1:31 pm

As I see it Steve government in your country is caught up in a cleft stick over military spending. Since armaments, the physical means to wage war, are manufactured by private firms (in some other countries they use state manufacturing enterprises to do it): to keep these firms solvent and interested in producing US governments would need to keep placing orders lest these firms go bankrupt and close down for good. At which point America's capability to produce its own means for military defence would crumble. It seems to be a Catch-22 scenario.

I don't know how many participants on this website know about the principle of economics of scale: it means that the bigger the production run the cheaper each additional unit can be produced and sold. In motor vehicle manufacturing the most expensive part of the prodess is tooling up for a new make and model compared to which the "flow" costs of semi-processed materials, energy, labour and overhead are comparatively cheap. Exactly the same principle applies to the production of complex armiments. There iwould not be a single armaments industry in the world that would not welcome additional sales of the product to allied (and neutral) states abroad; for the simple reason that the economics of scale effect ultimately make the product cheaper for the home government. Unfortunately, too many out of ignorence still equate that with "capitalist greed" for profits.

User avatar
SteveFoerster
Posts: 2712
Joined: Thu Dec 15, 2016 7:17 pm
Location: Probably DCA, YYJ, or DOM
Contact:

Re: The American War Budget

Post by SteveFoerster » Sat Jan 01, 2022 3:00 pm

neverfail wrote:
Sat Jan 01, 2022 1:31 pm
As I see it Steve government in your country is caught up in a cleft stick over military spending. Since armaments, the physical means to wage war, are manufactured by private firms (in some other countries they use state manufacturing enterprises to do it): to keep these firms solvent and interested in producing US governments would need to keep placing orders lest these firms go bankrupt and close down for good. At which point America's capability to produce its own means for military defence would crumble. It seems to be a Catch-22 scenario.
To some extent, but it's less that it would crumble and more that it's designed to meet political needs rather than defence needs. When the goal of every major program is to ensure that at least a little of it is built or managed in every Congressional district, that's inevitably at odds with any attempt at efficiency or military readiness.

That's the problem with crony corporatism. It retains everything inefficient about the state and allows businesses involved to operate without the constraints one would find in an actual market. Pentagon spending is in such disarray that it literally cannot be audited -- they've tried.
neverfail wrote:
Sat Jan 01, 2022 1:31 pm
I don't know how many participants on this website know about the principle of economics of scale: it means that the bigger the production run the cheaper each additional unit can be produced and sold. In motor vehicle manufacturing the most expensive part of the prodess is tooling up for a new make and model compared to which the "flow" costs of semi-processed materials, energy, labour and overhead are comparatively cheap. Exactly the same principle applies to the production of complex armiments. There iwould not be a single armaments industry in the world that would not welcome additional sales of the product to allied (and neutral) states abroad; for the simple reason that the economics of scale effect ultimately make the product cheaper for the home government. Unfortunately, too many out of ignorence still equate that with "capitalist greed" for profits.
Plenty of countries do export weapons, including the U.S. This article about the monstrous price tag of the F-35 mentions that:

Writer, technologist, educator, gadfly.
President of New World University: https://newworld.ac

neverfail
Posts: 7789
Joined: Sun Dec 18, 2016 3:47 am
Location: Singapore

Re: The American War Budget

Post by neverfail » Sat Jan 01, 2022 4:24 pm

Steve, reading your reply (above) has inspired the following thoughts in my mind - and I now want to test them out on this website.

With so much US capital and productive capacity apparently tied up with the military-industrial complex (in which as you point out that market forces do not work and in which it pays to lobby politicans) would it not have an inimical "multiplier effect" throughout your entire national economy?

As I see it the United States has two significent advantages that my own country lacks. The first is that when you multiply America's relatively large population with its high average income (and resultant spending power) it allows American industry (and agriculture) an economics of scale that my own cannot match (which is why Australia has never been successful, for example, in establishing a cost-effective motor vehicle industry). The second advantage is that the USA is centrally located in the Earth's northern hemisphere with the crowded (and wealthy) lands of Europe on one side and the crowded (and now wealthy) lands of eastern Asia (like Japan and South Korea) on the other - instead of the tactical disadvantage of being marooned in an edge-of-the-Earth location as in the case of my country.

All in all the USA has the hallmark of a country that, all other things being equal, should be a hightly competitive and successful exporting country. Yet I gain the impression that the USA has not acheived a single year of surplus trade balance in the past 70 years.

The Peoples Republic of China, still without the high per-capita incomes of Americans and with (possibly) a lesser natural endowment than your country is running rings around the United States as an international trader and country of expanding economic fortune. Do you not agree therefore that the USA would be better off without the military-industrial complex?

User avatar
Sertorio
Posts: 6198
Joined: Fri Dec 16, 2016 3:12 am

Re: The American War Budget

Post by Sertorio » Sat Jan 01, 2022 4:32 pm

SteveFoerster wrote:
Sat Jan 01, 2022 12:24 pm
In the spirit of the new year, I'll overlook the more theatrical parts of that and simply agree with you that the U.S. military budget is ridiculously bloated, and that it's focused on projecting power abroad rather than solely to defend U.S. territory.
Very little of US military spending is directed at defending US territory, as no one threatens it. It goes mostly to offensive/aggressive policies meant to preserve US hold on the rest of the world. Well, that's about to end... No matter how much the US spends, its power is quickly decreasing... The days of empire are about over...

User avatar
SteveFoerster
Posts: 2712
Joined: Thu Dec 15, 2016 7:17 pm
Location: Probably DCA, YYJ, or DOM
Contact:

Re: The American War Budget

Post by SteveFoerster » Sat Jan 01, 2022 6:07 pm

neverfail wrote:
Sat Jan 01, 2022 4:24 pm
Do you not agree therefore that the USA would be better off without the military-industrial complex?
Yes... for all the difference my opinion makes.
Writer, technologist, educator, gadfly.
President of New World University: https://newworld.ac

User avatar
Sertorio
Posts: 6198
Joined: Fri Dec 16, 2016 3:12 am

Re: The American War Budget

Post by Sertorio » Sun Jan 02, 2022 2:10 am

SteveFoerster wrote:
Sat Jan 01, 2022 6:07 pm
neverfail wrote:
Sat Jan 01, 2022 4:24 pm
Do you not agree therefore that the USA would be better off without the military-industrial complex?
Yes... for all the difference my opinion makes.
The "military-industrial complex" is just a tool. What matters is the US ambition to be able to dictate its will on the rest of the world...

neverfail
Posts: 7789
Joined: Sun Dec 18, 2016 3:47 am
Location: Singapore

Re: The American War Budget

Post by neverfail » Sun Jan 02, 2022 2:42 am

Sertorio wrote:
Sun Jan 02, 2022 2:10 am


The "military-industrial complex" is just a tool. What matters is the US ambition to be able to dictate its will on the rest of the world...
Well, who would you rather see dictate its will on the rest of the world Sertorio?

User avatar
Sertorio
Posts: 6198
Joined: Fri Dec 16, 2016 3:12 am

Re: The American War Budget

Post by Sertorio » Sun Jan 02, 2022 2:59 am

neverfail wrote:
Sun Jan 02, 2022 2:42 am
Sertorio wrote:
Sun Jan 02, 2022 2:10 am


The "military-industrial complex" is just a tool. What matters is the US ambition to be able to dictate its will on the rest of the world...
Well, who would you rather see dictate its will on the rest of the world Sertorio?
Nobody!... We are all grownup and do not need anyone to tell us what to do...

Post Reply