Generation COVID

Discussion of current events
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Doc
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Generation COVID

Post by Doc » Fri Dec 31, 2021 11:33 am

“"I fancied myself as some kind of god....It is a sort of disease when you consider yourself some kind of god, the creator of everything, but I feel comfortable about it now since I began to live it out.” -- George Soros

neverfail
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Re: Generation COVID

Post by neverfail » Fri Dec 31, 2021 1:14 pm

Doc wrote:
Fri Dec 31, 2021 11:33 am
"Generation Covid by Doc"? :lol:

Yep, it seems appropriate! :D

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SteveFoerster
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Re: Generation COVID

Post by SteveFoerster » Fri Dec 31, 2021 1:27 pm

As I've said to my kids, all of whom are Zoomers, their generation was plagued by mental health problems long before COVID. In particular there's a notable lack of resilience amongst them that I find very troubling. And they didn't disagree with me.

As a lifelong Star Trek fan, I've seen this in the evolution of the franchise. The original series in the '60s has an episode where a crewman seemingly dies and Kirk says, "He knew the risks when he joined the Service." Now we have Star Trek: Discovery, which, while a good show that I enjoy watching, includes characters regularly providing one another emotional support in the wake of any adversity or difficulty.

Now, I get it that by complaining that a show includes too many scenes of people being nice to each other, I'm the asshole. Fair enough, as you all know, I'm not afraid of that. :lol: But the expectation of fragility that the characters display is still noticeable.
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Re: Generation COVID

Post by neverfail » Fri Dec 31, 2021 9:16 pm

Hi Steve,

Here in Australia there has been a big rise in the number of people seeking help from the likes of Lifeline and other sources of support for people with depression. This as a result of our local repeat Covid epidemics (and resultant lockdowns) which in their consequences have been barely a fraction as severe as in your country. I have suffered lifelong from a mental health disorder that includes bouts of chronic depression. Yet over the past two years I have not experienced any deterioration in my state of mental health: If anything I have thriven.

So what would I attribute my comparative good fortune to? Apart from the loving support provided me by fasmily and friends - which has been important; the clincher I believe is that over several decades I have accumulated coping skills that serve me well now. If I experience the onset of any of the symptoms of my old bane I now find that I know what to do.

By contrast: many others who have had it better off than me over the years have had not the incentive to acquire the same coping skills and therefore do not know what to do when depression and/or lockdown stress/fatigue sets in.

I do not submit this note as a boast. I do it only to put on record how a person's sour cream of yore can, with changing circumstances and priorities, magically turn into quite edible yogurt.

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Re: Generation COVID

Post by SteveFoerster » Fri Dec 31, 2021 11:19 pm

I'm not surprised some people there are finding it difficult to cope. Australia's lockdowns have been draconian enough even to make the news in the U.S.
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Re: Which curse do you prefer?

Post by neverfail » Sat Jan 01, 2022 2:30 am

SteveFoerster wrote:
Fri Dec 31, 2021 11:19 pm
I'm not surprised some people there are finding it difficult to cope. Australia's lockdowns have been draconian enough even to make the news in the U.S.
Which observation is beside the point Steve.

The point is that until the beginning of the current Omricom varient: (and with the exception of our State of Victoria where their state government screwed up early on the policing of quarantine proceedures: that was the state that had the longest lockdowns as its state government tried to quell the runaway epidemic that their earlier negligence had unleashed on the community). The epidemic management procedures worked to give this country one of the lowest Covid-relatted infection, hospitalisation and death rates in the world.

In other countries where there were fewer and shorter lockdowns the greater prevalence of Covid in the surrounding society would surely be an even more potent source of depression (and general insecurity among the populace at large).

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Re: Generation COVID

Post by Doc » Sat Jan 01, 2022 11:05 am

SteveFoerster wrote:
Fri Dec 31, 2021 1:27 pm
As I've said to my kids, all of whom are Zoomers, their generation was plagued by mental health problems long before COVID. In particular there's a notable lack of resilience amongst them that I find very troubling. And they didn't disagree with me.

As a lifelong Star Trek fan, I've seen this in the evolution of the franchise. The original series in the '60s has an episode where a crewman seemingly dies and Kirk says, "He knew the risks when he joined the Service." Now we have Star Trek: Discovery, which, while a good show that I enjoy watching, includes characters regularly providing one another emotional support in the wake of any adversity or difficulty.

Now, I get it that by complaining that a show includes too many scenes of people being nice to each other, I'm the asshole. Fair enough, as you all know, I'm not afraid of that. :lol: But the expectation of fragility that the characters display is still noticeable.
It was noticed i Next Gen at the beginning, as well. Then they took things closer to the original in the plot lines and in some ways went further. In the original only NPCs died as far as I recall. In Next Gen one of the main characters died. After starting out the series some akin to a Disney formula animated movie. It seemed like it to me anyway. Maybe it was just because I grew up in the intervening years waiting for Star Trek to be brought back.

As for kids. Something I do know i true is that they have been for the last 40 years or so been told in school that there are real boogie men out there. All because of our societal obsession over child abductions. When people say child abduction they generally think on terms of abducted by strangers then sexually abused. While that is something that should never happen once, and is the only thing I could think of in terms of the death penalty out of the 50,000 children that go missing per year. (the number generally cited by 'The experts") 49,500 of those abducts are non custodial parents taking the children. Only 500 are abducted by strangers.

In schools children are constantly warned about strangers Which is bound to have a strong negative emotional impact on children. IMHO I think this is where wokiness starts in children. Parents have also gotten much more protective because of "50,000 abducted children per year." That is where the "Free range children" movement comes from. A couple of years ago a Maryland couple nearly lost custody of their children because they allowed them to go to a park a mile from their home by themselves. To keep custody of their children they had to agree never to let them go to places like that park alone again.

When I was a kid my father had the rule that I had to ask if I wanted to a couple of miles to "downtown" with my friends I had to ask permission.

We started going downtown in fourth grade Mostly to watch the movies on Saturdays and in the summer. When I was in junior high I walked to and from school there everyday. i even had a newspaper route where I had to walk home, get my newspapers then walk up the next hill over then back and back up the same hill to home weekdays. Today I don't see any newspaper boys. About 10 or 15 years ago I saw a newspaper boy whose mother would drive him around his route every day.
“"I fancied myself as some kind of god....It is a sort of disease when you consider yourself some kind of god, the creator of everything, but I feel comfortable about it now since I began to live it out.” -- George Soros

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Re: Which curse do you prefer?

Post by SteveFoerster » Sat Jan 01, 2022 12:20 pm

neverfail wrote:
Sat Jan 01, 2022 2:30 am
In other countries where there were fewer and shorter lockdowns the greater prevalence of Covid in the surrounding society would surely be an even more potent source of depression (and general insecurity among the populace at large).
I take your overall point. I'd disagree about "surely" here, though, since, at least in North America, young people of all persuasions and older people on the right seem largely unworried about the prevalence of COVID.
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SteveFoerster
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Re: Generation COVID

Post by SteveFoerster » Sat Jan 01, 2022 12:29 pm

Doc wrote:
Sat Jan 01, 2022 11:05 am
We started going downtown in fourth grade Mostly to watch the movies on Saturdays and in the summer. When I was in junior high I walked to and from school there everyday. i even had a newspaper route where I had to walk home, get my newspapers then walk up the next hill over then back and back up the same hill to home weekdays. Today I don't see any newspaper boys. About 10 or 15 years ago I saw a newspaper boy whose mother would drive him around his route every day.
I know what you mean. When I was a kid I pretty much went as far as I wanted as long as I was home when expected. Here's a concrete example:

https://www.freerangekids.com/how-child ... nerations/
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Re: Generation COVID

Post by Apollonius » Sat Jan 01, 2022 1:15 pm

SteveFoerster wrote:
Fri Dec 31, 2021 1:27 pm
As I've said to my kids, all of whom are Zoomers, their generation was plagued by mental health problems long before COVID. In particular there's a notable lack of resilience amongst them that I find very troubling. And they didn't disagree with me.

As a lifelong Star Trek fan, I've seen this in the evolution of the franchise. The original series in the '60s has an episode where a crewman seemingly dies and Kirk says, "He knew the risks when he joined the Service." Now we have Star Trek: Discovery, which, while a good show that I enjoy watching, includes characters regularly providing one another emotional support in the wake of any adversity or difficulty.

Now, I get it that by complaining that a show includes too many scenes of people being nice to each other, I'm the asshole. Fair enough, as you all know, I'm not afraid of that. :lol: But the expectation of fragility that the characters display is still noticeable.





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