Would America Survive a Civil War?

Discussion of current events
User avatar
SteveFoerster
Posts: 2518
Joined: Thu Dec 15, 2016 7:17 pm
Location: Probably DCA, YYJ, or DOM
Contact:

Re: Would America Survive a Civil War?

Post by SteveFoerster » Mon Nov 15, 2021 11:17 am

Doc wrote:
Mon Nov 15, 2021 9:13 am
Second little known fact. Arlington National Cemetery was once Robert E Lee's home. The union General in charge of burying Union Soldiers seized it, and buried his son literally at Robert E Lee's front door. The grave is still there today.
Similarly, Memorial Bridge, one of the bridges that connects Arlington, Virginia with Washington, D.C. was placed so that the Lincoln Memorial would be straight ahead in one direction, and Arlington House would be straight ahead in the other. Strange to think they're just a short walk apart, but they are.

Arlington is literally my hometown, so I could do this all day! ;)
Writer, technologist, educator, gadfly.
President of New World University: https://newworld.ac

neverfail
Posts: 7601
Joined: Sun Dec 18, 2016 3:47 am
Location: Singapore

Re: Would America Survive a Civil War?

Post by neverfail » Mon Nov 15, 2021 1:39 pm

Doc wrote:
Mon Nov 15, 2021 9:13 am


Meanwhile, the DOD’s vaccine mandate for service members has faced numerous challenges in court, including one filed earlier this month by a group of Navy SEALs who argued that the Biden administration denied them religious exemptions to the shot.

Their complaint, filed in the U.S. District Court in the Northern District of Texas last week, argued that the plaintiffs sought a religious exemption to the Pentagon’s vaccine mandate, but were denied the “fundamental right to the free exercise of religion and protection from agency action,” which they said “is unlawful, contrary to law, and arbitrary and capricious.”
They are hiding behind freedom of religion as their ploy to evade having to be innoculated.

How often in the past have this "free exercise of conscience" claim been used as a convenient excuse to evade public duty?

User avatar
Doc
Posts: 6259
Joined: Thu Dec 15, 2016 7:09 pm
Location: Cradle To Grave

Re: Would America Survive a Civil War?

Post by Doc » Mon Nov 15, 2021 3:39 pm

SteveFoerster wrote:
Mon Nov 15, 2021 11:17 am
Doc wrote:
Mon Nov 15, 2021 9:13 am
Second little known fact. Arlington National Cemetery was once Robert E Lee's home. The union General in charge of burying Union Soldiers seized it, and buried his son literally at Robert E Lee's front door. The grave is still there today.
Similarly, Memorial Bridge, one of the bridges that connects Arlington, Virginia with Washington, D.C. was placed so that the Lincoln Memorial would be straight ahead in one direction, and Arlington House would be straight ahead in the other. Strange to think they're just a short walk apart, but they are.

Arlington is literally my hometown, so I could do this all day! ;)
I am sure you do. There is so much history in and around DC I think it would take more than a lifetime to take it all in.

About a week after 911 I was standing on the point on the path between the Mansion, and the tomb of the unknown soldier with my then month long newlywed Brazilian wife. When I looked down and saw the Pentagon burning. I pointed it out to my wife, and behind me a woman that was walking up behind us made a small shriek, then turned around and ran back towards the mansion crying.

It was literally years before I could go back to DC without feeling the anger boiling inside thinking about that.

From there we went to the amphitheater by the Tomb where we met three special forces soldiers. They were there as tourists. They were all on the short side of 25. Talking to them it was all "Yes sirs" "Yes mams"

Previously to 911 my Wife's mothers was calling everyday telling her to please come back to Brazil because she had a dream about the US and buildings burning. Once 911 happened my wife wasn't so sure about it.

But after that day in Arlington, she stopped talking about going back, even though I could tell she was still very afraid.
“"I fancied myself as some kind of god....It is a sort of disease when you consider yourself some kind of god, the creator of everything, but I feel comfortable about it now since I began to live it out.” -- George Soros

neverfail
Posts: 7601
Joined: Sun Dec 18, 2016 3:47 am
Location: Singapore

Re: Would America Survive a Civil War?

Post by neverfail » Mon Nov 15, 2021 5:51 pm

Doc wrote:
Mon Nov 15, 2021 3:39 pm
SteveFoerster wrote:
Mon Nov 15, 2021 11:17 am
Doc wrote:
Mon Nov 15, 2021 9:13 am
Second little known fact. Arlington National Cemetery was once Robert E Lee's home. The union General in charge of burying Union Soldiers seized it, and buried his son literally at Robert E Lee's front door. The grave is still there today.
Similarly, Memorial Bridge, one of the bridges that connects Arlington, Virginia with Washington, D.C. was placed so that the Lincoln Memorial would be straight ahead in one direction, and Arlington House would be straight ahead in the other. Strange to think they're just a short walk apart, but they are.

Arlington is literally my hometown, so I could do this all day! ;)
I am sure you do. There is so much history in and around DC I think it would take more than a lifetime to take it all in.

About a week after 911 I was standing on the point on the path between the Mansion, and the tomb of the unknown soldier with my then month long newlywed Brazilian wife. When I looked down and saw the Pentagon burning. I pointed it out to my wife, and behind me a woman that was walking up behind us made a small shriek, then turned around and ran back towards the mansion crying.

It was literally years before I could go back to DC without feeling the anger boiling inside thinking about that.

From there we went to the amphitheater by the Tomb where we met three special forces soldiers. They were there as tourists. They were all on the short side of 25. Talking to them it was all "Yes sirs" "Yes mams"

Previously to 911 my Wife's mothers was calling everyday telling her to please come back to Brazil because she had a dream about the US and buildings burning. Once 911 happened my wife wasn't so sure about it.

But after that day in Arlington, she stopped talking about going back, even though I could tell she was still very afraid.
Something similar happened in my life after I brought my bride home from the Philippines. After a week my wife asked me to send her back to the Philippines. After the cost of our marriage and getting her here to Australia I was broke and could not afford to. It took me a little time but I eventually worked out what was wrong.

My wife was suffering the blues typical of any newly arrived immigrant. I had plucked her away from her family, friends - the entire human support ecosystem she had been part of her life back in her home country. In other words my wife felt like a fish out of water and was homesick.

After a month I took her to visit an old friend of hers from the Philippines living in a distant suburb who had married and emigrated years earlier. That seemed to help a lot and gradually she established a new network of friends and contacts. Eventually we were able to sponsor her mother down from the Philippines and later on other members of her family and some relatives.

Doc, reading between the lines I can see that your Brazillian wife like my spouse when she first arrived in her new country was likely suffering from the loneliness of the newly arrived immigrant. Even without the added shock of witnessing one of the 9/11 attacks and even with the support of a loving, understanding spouse she still likely would have had to have gone through the sense of berivement that comes with an abrupt loss of all that is familar.

User avatar
Doc
Posts: 6259
Joined: Thu Dec 15, 2016 7:09 pm
Location: Cradle To Grave

Re: Would America Survive a Civil War?

Post by Doc » Wed Nov 17, 2021 1:32 pm

neverfail wrote:
Mon Nov 15, 2021 5:51 pm
Doc wrote:
Mon Nov 15, 2021 3:39 pm
SteveFoerster wrote:
Mon Nov 15, 2021 11:17 am
Doc wrote:
Mon Nov 15, 2021 9:13 am
Second little known fact. Arlington National Cemetery was once Robert E Lee's home. The union General in charge of burying Union Soldiers seized it, and buried his son literally at Robert E Lee's front door. The grave is still there today.
Similarly, Memorial Bridge, one of the bridges that connects Arlington, Virginia with Washington, D.C. was placed so that the Lincoln Memorial would be straight ahead in one direction, and Arlington House would be straight ahead in the other. Strange to think they're just a short walk apart, but they are.

Arlington is literally my hometown, so I could do this all day! ;)
I am sure you do. There is so much history in and around DC I think it would take more than a lifetime to take it all in.

About a week after 911 I was standing on the point on the path between the Mansion, and the tomb of the unknown soldier with my then month long newlywed Brazilian wife. When I looked down and saw the Pentagon burning. I pointed it out to my wife, and behind me a woman that was walking up behind us made a small shriek, then turned around and ran back towards the mansion crying.

It was literally years before I could go back to DC without feeling the anger boiling inside thinking about that.

From there we went to the amphitheater by the Tomb where we met three special forces soldiers. They were there as tourists. They were all on the short side of 25. Talking to them it was all "Yes sirs" "Yes mams"

Previously to 911 my Wife's mothers was calling everyday telling her to please come back to Brazil because she had a dream about the US and buildings burning. Once 911 happened my wife wasn't so sure about it.

But after that day in Arlington, she stopped talking about going back, even though I could tell she was still very afraid.
Something similar happened in my life after I brought my bride home from the Philippines. After a week my wife asked me to send her back to the Philippines. After the cost of our marriage and getting her here to Australia I was broke and could not afford to. It took me a little time but I eventually worked out what was wrong.

My wife was suffering the blues typical of any newly arrived immigrant. I had plucked her away from her family, friends - the entire human support ecosystem she had been part of her life back in her home country. In other words my wife felt like a fish out of water and was homesick.

After a month I took her to visit an old friend of hers from the Philippines living in a distant suburb who had married and emigrated years earlier. That seemed to help a lot and gradually she established a new network of friends and contacts. Eventually we were able to sponsor her mother down from the Philippines and later on other members of her family and some relatives.

Doc, reading between the lines I can see that your Brazillian wife like my spouse when she first arrived in her new country was likely suffering from the loneliness of the newly arrived immigrant. Even without the added shock of witnessing one of the 9/11 attacks and even with the support of a loving, understanding spouse she still likely would have had to have gone through the sense of berivement that comes with an abrupt loss of all that is familar.
My wife is pretty head strong about such things. She never said anything about going back until after 911. Her mother did that.

BTW I had a great aunt that was born in the Philippines and an aunt as well. The great aunt's granddaughter and my aunt's daughter both became fashion models. The grand daughter worked for two and quit after she made enough to pay for any college she wanted to go to. My cousin quit when she got married.
“"I fancied myself as some kind of god....It is a sort of disease when you consider yourself some kind of god, the creator of everything, but I feel comfortable about it now since I began to live it out.” -- George Soros

Post Reply