China's self-inflicted energy shortage.

Discussion of current events
User avatar
Doc
Posts: 6118
Joined: Thu Dec 15, 2016 7:09 pm
Location: Cradle To Grave

Re: China's self-inflicted energy shortage.

Post by Doc » Fri Oct 01, 2021 5:38 am

cassowary wrote:
Thu Sep 30, 2021 11:24 pm
Doc wrote:
Thu Sep 30, 2021 6:54 pm
neverfail wrote:
Thu Sep 30, 2021 3:00 pm
cassowary wrote:
Thu Sep 30, 2021 5:16 am

Because Australia is the only known source of quality coal... :roll:
Because it is the most cost-effective supplier and has a coal mining and delivery infrastructure on a scale that can supply China with the quantities of coal it needs.

Since the rift with Australia the PRC has tried inporting coal from Russia: but to deliver to users that requires long rail journeys overland from the Russian mines with the result that Russian coal in China costs twice as much as Australian coal (which is delivered by sea at a much lower average cost per tonne per kilometer). Xi must have ordered those purchases as a fillip to China's Eurasian ally: a political purchase as distinct from one that makes economic sense.

The PRC also is importing more coal from Indonesia - whose exports of thermal coal even before the PRC rift with Australia were apparently bigger than ours. I have been told that the problem with Indonesian black coal is that it is sulphur laden crap that burns at a low temperature. So much so that Chinese users have found that to be any good Indo coal needs to be mixed with other coal with a higher BTU yield of heat energy to boost the combined heat yield to a level where it can heat up the water needed to drive the generators in their power stations. Indo coal apparently has only one redeeming characteristic - it is cheap. So by mixing Indo coal with higher BTU grades of coal (like ours) according to a known ratio they have found that it lowers the average fuel cost needed to generate a given number of kilowatt hours of electric power.

there is no way around it - China needs our coal!
Yes it seems Australia is defeating China.

The thing about Indian News media, especially the TFI Global, is that they like to exaggerate and sensationalize. They are also one sided and unbalanced. Singapore's CNA is known for its impartiality and accuracy. But I also find that boring and find myself watching TFI Global or WION instead.

By the way, I notice that TFI Global is pro Republiclan when it reports US news.
Yes they are most definitely biased on both counts. But they actually report on China and the CCP Whereas the US Media hardly reports on China and the CCP at all. IE they are all biased. The US MSM is in fantasy land most of the time. To pharaprase John Updike "Information is where you find it."

During WWII the Allies got information about the state of German Manufacturing and other general trends by reading every German newspaper they could get a hold of. They analyzed the stories to make predictions on trends.

The more information you have the better. Like with putting together a picture puzzle, the more pieces you have the better.
So it is better to have information that is biased then no information at all. You just have to look at the information differently.


From the reviews

Top reviews from the United States
Wayne Palmer
5.0 out of 5 stars Still Right on After 30 Years
Reviewed in the United States on February 17, 2014
Verified Purchase
I read this book in 1982 and found it to be extremely insightful. Re-reading it today, I am convinced that John Naisbitt was prophetic in this work. So much of what he predicted has unfolded as described over the past 30 years. I find that amazing and incredibly valuable. I believe this book still has merit for shaping current views of our world.
13 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report abuse
Thomas Garner
5.0 out of 5 stars Great when trying to determine trends for investment and other ...
Reviewed in the United States on April 19, 2016
Verified Purchase
Great when trying to determine trends for investment and other thing in life purposes. Forget your investment advisors, if your smart you can figure it out yourself if you pay attention. Read the book you'll see.
2 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report abuse
Bill Clancy
5.0 out of 5 stars This book changed my life
Reviewed in the United States on May 25, 2016
Verified Purchase
Read this book and it caused me to launch an IT career. Amazing vision, a life changing experience for me. One of those books you'll never forget
.
5 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report abuse
Poochie
5.0 out of 5 stars better every time
Reviewed in the United States on May 24, 2018
Verified Purchase
Second time to read it, better every time.
2 people found this helpful
Helpful
“"I fancied myself as some kind of god....It is a sort of disease when you consider yourself some kind of god, the creator of everything, but I feel comfortable about it now since I began to live it out.” -- George Soros

User avatar
cassowary
Posts: 5225
Joined: Thu Dec 15, 2016 11:30 pm

Re: China's self-inflicted energy shortage.

Post by cassowary » Fri Oct 01, 2021 6:51 am

neverfail wrote:
Fri Oct 01, 2021 5:27 am
cassowary wrote:
Thu Sep 30, 2021 11:32 pm
By now, Xi should know about the power shortages. Why is he not doing anything about it? Can't he get back to importing more coal from Austrlia or from other suppliers? Besides, Australia, there is Russia, Canada, the US, Indonesia and South Africa. China also has coal mines. Why does he not increase local production?
I believe that he has but at considerable cost. Accounting for perhaps 7% of the World's land area China has (I believe) around `15% of the world's known coal reserves: the second largest such endowment after the United States (6% of world's land but 24% of its coal). But if mining coal in China were either profitable or easy do you think that they would be importing so much of it cass?

This energy crunch in China is not just a matter of supply and demand. The abscence of normal supplies of Australian coal has helped cause the price of this fuel go through the roof (not helped by the fact that other fuels have risen in proce globally as well). However the PRC government has imposed a maximim price that electric power utilities can charge consumers that is often insufficient for these to pass on their increased costs to consumers. So caught between the rock of rising costs and the hard place of government price restrictions a lot of the electric power utilities are switching off the turbines in order to cut losses that would otherwise lead to bankruptcy. That is the reason for the power shortages in China.
..............................................................................................................................................

It is not just a matter of having the coal in the ground but also the means to beliver the stuff to market. Most of Australia's black coal is located along our eastern seaboard. For seaborne exports the coal is brought to the coal port by train in specially designed wagons. The process of then transferring the coal to the ships is a highly mechanised one. Not every country with coal reserves and a coastline has the needed coal loading machinery. New South Wales has four of them: one at Port Kembla south of Sydney and three at Newcastle, and all four of them work around the clock 365 days per year loading coal into the holds of the bulk ore carrier ships that carry it to overseas markets. Queensland has a similar number of coal loaders scattered more widely along its coast and these also work 24/7 all year long loading up the ships.

The USA also has several coal loaders in coastal locations but most of these seem to be loacated along its Atlantic coast. Okay if you are shipping coal to Europe but not practical if you are trying to send it to China; given the needed long diversion through the Panama Canal before crossing the Pacific a longer distance than those from the Australian coal ports to the receiving Chinese ones.

https://www.eia.gov/todayinenergy/detail.php?id=32092

While this above US 2017 report mentions building new coal loaders on its Pacific side I do not know whether these have since been built. There are environmental laws and other constraints there. Not as easy as it sounds.

Russia: closest coal mines located deep in Siberia a long way by rail from the locations in China where it is needed. Since terrestial transport per kilometer per tonne of cargo costs considerably more than by water borne transport then you may begin to understand why Russian coal costs approx. twice as much in China as does Australian coal.

Why is Australia so well equipped to be a coal exporting country? It did not happen overnight. Until 1955 when we sent our first shipment to Japan coal mining in Australia had been developed as a domestic industry. But that shipment was so well received in Japan that Japanese users soon ordered more. So step by step this country got into the coal export business firstly in response to growing post WW2 Japanese demand then later South Korean and then Chinese demand.

You might better understand now, in light of costs and the time lag other would-be alternative supplier nations would need to develop the needed facilities why the PRC will likely need (in light of their current energy crisis) to come back to Australia to supply their coal.
Haha. So Xi has the choice of swallowing his pride (or as they say lose face) or watching his people freeze this winter.
The Imp :D

neverfail
Posts: 7418
Joined: Sun Dec 18, 2016 3:47 am
Location: Singapore

Re: China's self-inflicted energy shortage.

Post by neverfail » Fri Oct 01, 2021 3:53 pm

cassowary wrote:
Fri Oct 01, 2021 6:51 am
Haha. So Xi has the choice of swallowing his pride (or as they say lose face) or watching his people freeze this winter.


It would seem that way Cass.

The problem (as pointed out by me above) is that PRC electric power producers are caught up in a classic cost-price squeeze. Costs have risen considerably but earnings have not due to government restrictions on the maximim price per KwH these companies can charge. I believe that now faced with losses and possible bankruptcies the management of a lot of the power plants are ordering shut downs of the generators in order to curb losses and therefore avert (or at least postpone) bankruptcy.
.....................................................................................................................................

Cass (as you seem to be interested): China still has a lot more coal left in the ground than Australia but I suspect that the average cost of recovering it is high. I do not know whether as a "flow on" from the Deng reforms of 1978 whether they privatised coal mining in the PRC - probably not! I have reason to believe that the ruling party has kept a lot of their coal mines working as a "make work" exercise in order to keep men in coal mining districts gainfully employed and thus avert mass unemployment resulting in social unrest - something to be feared in China.

You do not even need a country to be ruled by a Communist Party for this to happen. During the post WW2 slump in Britain the Labor government led by Clement Attlee nationalised the nation's coal mining industry for the same reason. Oh sure! Their cover story (or excuse) would have been that they were "building socialism" but :lol: if you believe that then you must believe in bullshit. Many of Britain's coal mines by then had seen better days and so mining coal had largely become sub-economic; especially in light of the global shift from coal to oil as the preferred fuel for transport and industry then underway. So nationalising the mines and keeping the miners (who were overwhealmingly Labour Party supporters) employed would have been a practical way of averting having to place entire communities permanently on the dole. Regardless of whether the dole or subsidies to mining to cover losses on the sale of coal it was still going to cost the British government money - so better the latter than the former. As for the former mine owners they would have been likely content with the compensation paid to them from the public purse as their mine assets by then had had no private sector sale value and the money received was capital to re-invest in more profitable assets such as Britains new electronics and chemicals industries.

I am sure that the PRC government would have brought in those price restrictions out of "enlightened" self-interest. Citizens of the PRC would have enjoyed paying extra for their electric power supplies no more than the rest of us do. But by imposing maximum price rules that, with the efflux of time and the cumulative effect of inflation has made it sub-economic to produce and sell electric power the PRC government seems to be set on ensuring unpopularity for itself through the blackouts and brownouts now taking place across the country. It is in a "no-win" situation for them. "damned if it does and damned if it does not".

( I am sure cass that you are thoroughly enjoying its quandary :D )

User avatar
cassowary
Posts: 5225
Joined: Thu Dec 15, 2016 11:30 pm

Re: China's self-inflicted energy shortage.

Post by cassowary » Mon Oct 04, 2021 8:33 am

Doc wrote:
Fri Oct 01, 2021 5:38 am
cassowary wrote:
Thu Sep 30, 2021 11:24 pm
Doc wrote:
Thu Sep 30, 2021 6:54 pm
neverfail wrote:
Thu Sep 30, 2021 3:00 pm
cassowary wrote:
Thu Sep 30, 2021 5:16 am

Because Australia is the only known source of quality coal... :roll:
Because it is the most cost-effective supplier and has a coal mining and delivery infrastructure on a scale that can supply China with the quantities of coal it needs.

Since the rift with Australia the PRC has tried inporting coal from Russia: but to deliver to users that requires long rail journeys overland from the Russian mines with the result that Russian coal in China costs twice as much as Australian coal (which is delivered by sea at a much lower average cost per tonne per kilometer). Xi must have ordered those purchases as a fillip to China's Eurasian ally: a political purchase as distinct from one that makes economic sense.

The PRC also is importing more coal from Indonesia - whose exports of thermal coal even before the PRC rift with Australia were apparently bigger than ours. I have been told that the problem with Indonesian black coal is that it is sulphur laden crap that burns at a low temperature. So much so that Chinese users have found that to be any good Indo coal needs to be mixed with other coal with a higher BTU yield of heat energy to boost the combined heat yield to a level where it can heat up the water needed to drive the generators in their power stations. Indo coal apparently has only one redeeming characteristic - it is cheap. So by mixing Indo coal with higher BTU grades of coal (like ours) according to a known ratio they have found that it lowers the average fuel cost needed to generate a given number of kilowatt hours of electric power.

there is no way around it - China needs our coal!
Yes it seems Australia is defeating China.

The thing about Indian News media, especially the TFI Global, is that they like to exaggerate and sensationalize. They are also one sided and unbalanced. Singapore's CNA is known for its impartiality and accuracy. But I also find that boring and find myself watching TFI Global or WION instead.

By the way, I notice that TFI Global is pro Republiclan when it reports US news.
Yes they are most definitely biased on both counts. But they actually report on China and the CCP Whereas the US Media hardly reports on China and the CCP at all. IE they are all biased. The US MSM is in fantasy land most of the time. To pharaprase John Updike "Information is where you find it."

During WWII the Allies got information about the state of German Manufacturing and other general trends by reading every German newspaper they could get a hold of. They analyzed the stories to make predictions on trends.

The more information you have the better. Like with putting together a picture puzzle, the more pieces you have the better.
So it is better to have information that is biased then no information at all. You just have to look at the information differently.


From the reviews

Top reviews from the United States
Wayne Palmer
5.0 out of 5 stars Still Right on After 30 Years
Reviewed in the United States on February 17, 2014
Verified Purchase
I read this book in 1982 and found it to be extremely insightful. Re-reading it today, I am convinced that John Naisbitt was prophetic in this work. So much of what he predicted has unfolded as described over the past 30 years. I find that amazing and incredibly valuable. I believe this book still has merit for shaping current views of our world.
13 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report abuse
Thomas Garner
5.0 out of 5 stars Great when trying to determine trends for investment and other ...
Reviewed in the United States on April 19, 2016
Verified Purchase
Great when trying to determine trends for investment and other thing in life purposes. Forget your investment advisors, if your smart you can figure it out yourself if you pay attention. Read the book you'll see.
2 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report abuse
Bill Clancy
5.0 out of 5 stars This book changed my life
Reviewed in the United States on May 25, 2016
Verified Purchase
Read this book and it caused me to launch an IT career. Amazing vision, a life changing experience for me. One of those books you'll never forget
.
5 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report abuse
Poochie
5.0 out of 5 stars better every time
Reviewed in the United States on May 24, 2018
Verified Purchase
Second time to read it, better every time.
2 people found this helpful
Helpful
Eh, What's up Doc?

Take a look at how our CNA report the same story about the black outs in China:



Singapore's top TV station is known for its accuracy and impartial reporting. But it's so boring. I rather watch TFIGlobal even though I know it likes to exaggerate, sensationalize and does not let accuracy get in the way of reporting a good story. But that's Indian news. Its all about viewership and advertisng $$$. Take it with a pinch of salt Doc. Then check with CNA to make sure they got the facts right.
The Imp :D

User avatar
Doc
Posts: 6118
Joined: Thu Dec 15, 2016 7:09 pm
Location: Cradle To Grave

Re: China's self-inflicted energy shortage.

Post by Doc » Mon Oct 04, 2021 3:37 pm

cassowary wrote:
Mon Oct 04, 2021 8:33 am
neverfail wrote:
Thu Sep 30, 2021 3:00 pm
cassowary wrote:
Mon Oct 04, 2021 8:33 am

Because Australia is the only known source of quality coal... :roll:
Because it is the most cost-effective supplier and has a coal mining and delivery infrastructure on a scale that can supply China with the quantities of coal it needs.

Since the rift with Australia the PRC has tried inporting coal from Russia: but to deliver to users that requires long rail journeys overland from the Russian mines with the result that Russian coal in China costs twice as much as Australian coal (which is delivered by sea at a much lower average cost per tonne per kilometer). Xi must have ordered those purchases as a fillip to China's Eurasian ally: a political purchase as distinct from one that makes economic sense.

The PRC also is importing more coal from Indonesia - whose exports of thermal coal even before the PRC rift with Australia were apparently bigger than ours. I have been told that the problem with Indonesian black coal is that it is sulphur laden crap that burns at a low temperature. So much so that Chinese users have found that to be any good Indo coal needs to be mixed with other coal with a higher BTU yield of heat energy to boost the combined heat yield to a level where it can heat up the water needed to drive the generators in their power stations. Indo coal apparently has only one redeeming characteristic - it is cheap. So by mixing Indo coal with higher BTU grades of coal (like ours) according to a known ratio they have found that it lowers the average fuel cost needed to generate a given number of kilowatt hours of electric power.

there is no way around it - China needs our coal!

Eh, What's up Doc?

Take a look at how our CNA report the same story about the black outs in China:



Singapore's top TV station is known for its accuracy and impartial reporting. But it's so boring. I rather watch TFIGlobal even though I know it likes to exaggerate, sensationalize and does not let accuracy get in the way of reporting a good story. But that's Indian news. Its all about viewership and advertisng $$$. Take it with a pinch of salt Doc. Then check with CNA to make sure they got the facts right.
Like Neverfail and you yourself said Coal has no good option to replace Australian coal. IN the CNA story they talk about ramping up production of coal. The problem is Chinese coal is apparently low energy coal. Chinese power plants are largely designed for higher BTW content coal. Changing the design of how a coal fire power plant is set up is not straight forward In my home town there is a trash to steam plant. It also burns coal. One day the conveyor for the trash broke down. The guy whose responsibility was to get it fix said they had to burn Natural ga at many thousand of dollars an hours rather than just the coal because the coal without the trash burned to hot. It would melt the boiler.
“"I fancied myself as some kind of god....It is a sort of disease when you consider yourself some kind of god, the creator of everything, but I feel comfortable about it now since I began to live it out.” -- George Soros

neverfail
Posts: 7418
Joined: Sun Dec 18, 2016 3:47 am
Location: Singapore

Re: China's self-inflicted energy shortage.

Post by neverfail » Mon Oct 04, 2021 3:51 pm

Doc wrote:
Mon Oct 04, 2021 3:37 pm

Like Neverfail and you yourself said Coal has no good option to replace Australian coal. IN the CNA story they talk about ramping up production of coal. The problem is Chinese coal is apparently low energy coal. Chinese power plants are largely designed for higher BTW content coal. Changing the design of how a coal fire power plant is set up is not straight forward In my home town there is a trash to steam plant. It also burns coal. One day the conveyor for the trash broke down. The guy whose responsibility was to get it fix said they had to burn Natural ga at many thousand of dollars an hours rather than just the coal because the coal without the trash burned to hot. It would melt the boiler.
:lol: ...and I believe that Doc is NOT talking rubbish there either. :)

User avatar
Doc
Posts: 6118
Joined: Thu Dec 15, 2016 7:09 pm
Location: Cradle To Grave

Re: China's self-inflicted energy shortage.

Post by Doc » Mon Oct 04, 2021 10:04 pm

Doc wrote:
Mon Oct 04, 2021 3:37 pm
cassowary wrote:
Mon Oct 04, 2021 8:33 am
neverfail wrote:
Thu Sep 30, 2021 3:00 pm
cassowary wrote:
Mon Oct 04, 2021 8:33 am

Because Australia is the only known source of quality coal... :roll:
Because it is the most cost-effective supplier and has a coal mining and delivery infrastructure on a scale that can supply China with the quantities of coal it needs.

Since the rift with Australia the PRC has tried inporting coal from Russia: but to deliver to users that requires long rail journeys overland from the Russian mines with the result that Russian coal in China costs twice as much as Australian coal (which is delivered by sea at a much lower average cost per tonne per kilometer). Xi must have ordered those purchases as a fillip to China's Eurasian ally: a political purchase as distinct from one that makes economic sense.

The PRC also is importing more coal from Indonesia - whose exports of thermal coal even before the PRC rift with Australia were apparently bigger than ours. I have been told that the problem with Indonesian black coal is that it is sulphur laden crap that burns at a low temperature. So much so that Chinese users have found that to be any good Indo coal needs to be mixed with other coal with a higher BTU yield of heat energy to boost the combined heat yield to a level where it can heat up the water needed to drive the generators in their power stations. Indo coal apparently has only one redeeming characteristic - it is cheap. So by mixing Indo coal with higher BTU grades of coal (like ours) according to a known ratio they have found that it lowers the average fuel cost needed to generate a given number of kilowatt hours of electric power.

there is no way around it - China needs our coal!

Eh, What's up Doc?

Take a look at how our CNA report the same story about the black outs in China:



Singapore's top TV station is known for its accuracy and impartial reporting. But it's so boring. I rather watch TFIGlobal even though I know it likes to exaggerate, sensationalize and does not let accuracy get in the way of reporting a good story. But that's Indian news. Its all about viewership and advertisng $$$. Take it with a pinch of salt Doc. Then check with CNA to make sure they got the facts right.
Like Neverfail and you yourself said Coal has no good option to replace Australian coal. IN the CNA story they talk about ramping up production of coal. The problem is Chinese coal is apparently low energy coal. Chinese power plants are largely designed for higher BTW content coal. Changing the design of how a coal fire power plant is set up is not straight forward In my home town there is a trash to steam plant. It also burns coal. One day the conveyor for the trash broke down. The guy whose responsibility was to get it fix said they had to burn Natural ga at many thousand of dollars an hours rather than just the coal because the coal without the trash burned to hot. It would melt the boiler.
I forgot to mention China Insights TFI is entertaining. China Insights can be highly informative and entertaining.

“"I fancied myself as some kind of god....It is a sort of disease when you consider yourself some kind of god, the creator of everything, but I feel comfortable about it now since I began to live it out.” -- George Soros

neverfail
Posts: 7418
Joined: Sun Dec 18, 2016 3:47 am
Location: Singapore

Re: China's self-inflicted energy shortage.

Post by neverfail » Mon Oct 04, 2021 10:12 pm

Doc wrote:
Mon Oct 04, 2021 10:04 pm

I forgot to mention China Insights TFI is entertaining. China Insights can be highly informative and entertaining.

How did this Aussie native stray so far off course?

It seems that we can't stay away from China. :lol: If it is not our coal it is our fauna.

User avatar
Doc
Posts: 6118
Joined: Thu Dec 15, 2016 7:09 pm
Location: Cradle To Grave

Re: China's self-inflicted energy shortage.

Post by Doc » Mon Oct 04, 2021 10:42 pm

neverfail wrote:
Mon Oct 04, 2021 10:12 pm
Doc wrote:
Mon Oct 04, 2021 10:04 pm

I forgot to mention China Insights TFI is entertaining. China Insights can be highly informative and entertaining.

How did this Aussie native stray so far off course?
On the wings of bats? :D

It seems that we can't stay away from China. :lol: If it is not our coal it is our fauna.
“"I fancied myself as some kind of god....It is a sort of disease when you consider yourself some kind of god, the creator of everything, but I feel comfortable about it now since I began to live it out.” -- George Soros

User avatar
cassowary
Posts: 5225
Joined: Thu Dec 15, 2016 11:30 pm

Re: China's self-inflicted energy shortage.

Post by cassowary » Tue Oct 05, 2021 7:44 am

Doc wrote:
Mon Oct 04, 2021 3:37 pm
cassowary wrote:
Mon Oct 04, 2021 8:33 am
neverfail wrote:
Thu Sep 30, 2021 3:00 pm
cassowary wrote:
Mon Oct 04, 2021 8:33 am

Because Australia is the only known source of quality coal... :roll:
Because it is the most cost-effective supplier and has a coal mining and delivery infrastructure on a scale that can supply China with the quantities of coal it needs.

Since the rift with Australia the PRC has tried inporting coal from Russia: but to deliver to users that requires long rail journeys overland from the Russian mines with the result that Russian coal in China costs twice as much as Australian coal (which is delivered by sea at a much lower average cost per tonne per kilometer). Xi must have ordered those purchases as a fillip to China's Eurasian ally: a political purchase as distinct from one that makes economic sense.

The PRC also is importing more coal from Indonesia - whose exports of thermal coal even before the PRC rift with Australia were apparently bigger than ours. I have been told that the problem with Indonesian black coal is that it is sulphur laden crap that burns at a low temperature. So much so that Chinese users have found that to be any good Indo coal needs to be mixed with other coal with a higher BTU yield of heat energy to boost the combined heat yield to a level where it can heat up the water needed to drive the generators in their power stations. Indo coal apparently has only one redeeming characteristic - it is cheap. So by mixing Indo coal with higher BTU grades of coal (like ours) according to a known ratio they have found that it lowers the average fuel cost needed to generate a given number of kilowatt hours of electric power.

there is no way around it - China needs our coal!

Eh, What's up Doc?

Take a look at how our CNA report the same story about the black outs in China:



Singapore's top TV station is known for its accuracy and impartial reporting. But it's so boring. I rather watch TFIGlobal even though I know it likes to exaggerate, sensationalize and does not let accuracy get in the way of reporting a good story. But that's Indian news. Its all about viewership and advertisng $$$. Take it with a pinch of salt Doc. Then check with CNA to make sure they got the facts right.
Like Neverfail and you yourself said Coal has no good option to replace Australian coal. IN the CNA story they talk about ramping up production of coal. The problem is Chinese coal is apparently low energy coal. Chinese power plants are largely designed for higher BTW content coal. Changing the design of how a coal fire power plant is set up is not straight forward In my home town there is a trash to steam plant. It also burns coal. One day the conveyor for the trash broke down. The guy whose responsibility was to get it fix said they had to burn Natural ga at many thousand of dollars an hours rather than just the coal because the coal without the trash burned to hot. It would melt the boiler.
Yep. Xi has to get back to Australian coal. But that will be a great embarassment for him or as they say in China, a great loss of face. As I said in another thread, Xi faces the perfect storm - the energy crisis, the property crash, trade war, ageing population and his foolish, paranoid crackdown on the private sector.
The Imp :D

Post Reply