Consider the possibility we are led by idiots

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Doc
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Consider the possibility we are led by idiots

Post by Doc » Wed Jun 02, 2021 6:01 pm

“"I fancied myself as some kind of god....It is a sort of disease when you consider yourself some kind of god, the creator of everything, but I feel comfortable about it now since I began to live it out.” -- George Soros

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Milo
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Re: Consider the possibility we are led by idiots

Post by Milo » Thu Jun 03, 2021 9:38 am

Doc wrote:
Wed Jun 02, 2021 6:01 pm
Consider the possibility that Ben Domenech is an idiot.
Plagiarism[edit]
In early 2006, Domenech was hired by the Washington Post's online arm to write a blog providing "a daily mix of commentary, analysis and cultural criticism".[37] Media Matters for America criticized the choice, claiming that "[t]here [were], however, no progressive bloggers—and no one left of center with the credentials of a political operative—on washingtonpost.com to provide balance to Domenech."[38] Instapundit founder Glenn Reynolds surmised in an interview The New York Times that Domenech's appointment had attracted anger among liberals "because he was a conservative and he was given real estate at The Washington Post" which in turn spurred bloggers to find "something they could use to get rid of him," referring to the disclosures only days after Domenech's appointment of his extensive plagiarism.[4]

Red America launched on March 21, 2006, but Domenech resigned three days later after having written only six posts, after his fellow bloggers posted evidence online that Domenech had plagiarized the work of other journalists from The Washington Post, The New Yorker, National Review, the humorist P. J. O'Rourke, the film critic Stephanie Zacharek, the writer, Mary Elizabeth Williams, and that of several other publications and writers. O'Rourke denied Domenech's claim that the humorist had granted permission to use his words: "I wouldn't want to swear in a court of law that I never met the guy", O'Rourke told The New York Times, "but I didn't give him permission to use my words under his byline, no."[4] Editors for Domenech's college newspaper, The Flat Hat, denied allegations by Domenech that one instance of plagiarism resulted from his editors having "inserted a passage from The New Yorker in an article without his knowledge," saying that "Mr. Domenech's actions, if true, [were] deeply offensive." In another instance, Domenech has plagiarized from a front-page article in The Washington Post, the very newspaper he was now going to work for.[4] On March 24, 2006, the editors of The National Review confirmed on its blog The Corner[39] that Domenech appeared to have plagiarized for at least one article he had written for that publication.

Demands for Domenech's resignation were immediate and came not only came from liberal and progressive writers and bloggers, but also many conservatives who had been previously supportive. Michelle Malkin, who published a book edited by Domenech, wrote:

I cheered for Ben, the editor of my last book at Regnery, when he announced his new position. I criticized unhinged bloggers on the Left who leveled vicious ad hominem attacks against him.
But now the determined moonbat hordes have exposed multiple instances of what clearly appear to me to be blatant lifting of entire, unique passages by Ben from other writers. It is one thing to paraphrase basic facts from a wire story. But to filch the original thoughts and distinctly crafted phrases of a writer without crediting him/her–and doing so repeatedly–is unacceptable in our business.[40]
The Washington Post online editor Jim Brady announced Domenech's resignation saying "[a]n investigation into these allegations [of plagiarism] was ongoing, and in the interim, Domenech has resigned, effective immediately."[41]

After initially denying that he had plagiarized, Domenech apologized, writing in a RedState post entitled "Contrition," that "[t]here is no excuse for this.... I hope that nothing I've done as a teenager or in my professional life will reflect badly on the movement and principles I believe in... I'm a young man, and I hope that in time that I can earn a measure of the respect that you have given me."[5]

Only days earlier, Domenech addressed his detractors, upset by his plagiarism, defiantly, writing in a blog post: "To my enemies: I take enormous solace in the fact that you spent this week bashing me, instead of America."[4]

Payments from Foreign Agent[edit]
In 2013, Domenech was implicated in a journalism scandal that resulted in the removal of his work from The Washington Examiner and The Huffington Post after it was disclosed that he had received $36,000 from Joshua Trevino, a conservative pundit and lobbyist, in exchange for writing favorable opinion pieces about the government of Malaysia without disclosing the financial relationship. The payments only came to light when Trevino registered as a foreign agent of the Malaysian government, and disclosed that Domenech was one of several young conservative writers he paid to write articles favorable to the Malaysian regime to bolster its image in conservative media.[6][7][42]

After disclosure of the payments, The Washington Examiner and The San Francisco Examiner removed Domenech's posts from their respective websites and replaced it with an editors' note saying that "the author of this item presented content for which, unbeknownst to us, and in violation of our standards, had received payment from a third party mentioned therein—a payment which he also failed to disclose." The Washington Examiner owned The San Francisco Examiner at the time and thus shared content.[6]

Buzzfeed reported at the time that the Malaysian government desired to bolster their public image because the regime had "been accused of multiple human rights abuses and restricting the press and personal freedoms. Anwar, the opposition leader, has faced prosecution for sodomy, a prosecution widely denounced in the West, which Trevino defended as more 'nuanced' than American observers realized."[6]

Domenech explained his actions at the time by saying that Trevino "did not ever have anyone looking over my shoulder for what I wrote, and the guidance really was just to write about the political fray there and give my own opinion. Of course, Josh picked me knowing what my opinion was — I stand by what I wrote at the time."[6]

Labor law violation[edit]
In 2019, following staff of other American media companies unionizing, co-founder Domenech tweeted "first one of you tries to unionize I swear I'll send you back to the salt mine".[43] In 2020, a National Labor Relations Board judge ruled that Domenech had threatened staff illegally and required the company to post notices in its offices and email employees to inform them about their legal rights.[44] Domenech argued unsuccessfully that the tweet was a joke. But the NLRB judge ruled: "In viewing the totality of the circumstances surrounding the tweet, this tweet had no other purpose except to threaten...Federalist employees with unspecified reprisal, as the underlying meaning of ‘salt mine’ so signifies."[44] The New Civil Liberties Alliance, a conservative, libertarian nonprofit dedicated to fighting what it regards as an excessive administrative state, and which had been representing The Federalist pro bono, announced that the they would appeal. Reason and National Review have published articles questioning the judge's decision.[45][46]

The NLRB upheld the judge's ruling in November 2020. The NLRB ordered The Federalist to "direct Domenech to delete the statement from his personal Twitter account, and to take appropriate steps to ensure Domenech complies with the directive." The Federalist said it would appeal.[47]

Other controversies[edit]
Domenech was caught at least once for allegedly fabricating a quote. A June 20, 2002, Spinsanity.org entry demonstrated that Domenech made up a quote he attributed to Tim Russert in order to defend President Bush.[48][49]

In a 2010 post written for CBS, Domenech wrongly described Supreme Court Justice nominee Elena Kagan as potentially the "first openly gay justice." Dan Farber, editor in chief of CBSNews.com, later said in a statement that "after looking at the facts we determined that it was nothing but pure and irresponsible speculation on the blogger's part."[50] Domenech said in an addendum to his column, "I have to correct my text here to say that Kagan is apparently still closeted—odd, because her female partner is rather well known in Harvard circles."[51] In fact, however, numerous reports confirmed that Kagan was not gay, forcing Domenech to issue a public apology to Kagan "if she is offended at all by my repetition of a Harvard rumor in a speculative blog post."[52]

In November 2017, The Federalist, the publication of which Domenech is a co-founder and publisher, came under criticism from both conservatives and liberals for publishing an opinion piece by Tully Borland, an Ouachita Baptist University philosopher, defending Roy Moore, a former Alabama Supreme Court justice, and then Republican candidate for the U.S. Senate, for dating teenagers, some as young as fourteen years old, while Moore himself was in his late 30s, arguing that such behavior was "not without some merit if one wants to raise a large family." In the subtitle of the article, Borland said that he himself had "a 14-year old daughter", and if he "caught Roy Moore doing what was alleged" to his own daughter, he would physically harm him. "That said," Borland continued, "I don't think it's wrong to vote for Moore." Borland also quoted another philosophy professor as telling him that when Moore pursued relationships with the young girls It was a "different time" and that she was "sick to death of people imposing their own moral standards on people" by contemporary standards of things they did in the past. [53]

Noah Rothman of the conservative Commentary Magazine stated that the op-ed was "rationalizing away child molestation" while "preening self-righteous in the process.[53] Molly Roberts of the Washington Post wrote that the op-ed was "uniquely awful" and advocated "moral bankruptcy"[54] Domenech defended The Federalist for publishing Borland's op-ed saying the magazine "remains avowedly committed to offering alternative views. For those that have a problem with this, the question is simple: what are you afraid of?"[55] The New York Times has since reported that one of the Federalist's largest, secret funders had been Dick Uihlein, a "Midwestern packing supply magnate and Trump donor" who has also financed Moore's Senate campaign.[35]

On February 21, 2018, Domenech sparked outrage after he called survivors of one of the worst mass shootings in the nation's history. at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, a "bunch of idiots".[56]

In July 2018, on the day that the Special Counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election indicted 12 Russian agents, Domenech disseminated information from a hoax version of the indictment documents. Domenech falsely reported that "much of it [the indictment] is taken up by the numbers of times that people were posting memes on the internet," citing the fake indictment, which claimed that the 12 Russians charged had only engaged in insignificant "shitposting" and the use of memes.[57][58]

In May 2019, Domenech's wife Meghan McCain appeared on Late Night with Seth Meyers, where she and Meyers discussed McCain's assertion that Rep. Ilhan Omar was anti-Semitic. Shortly thereafter, Domenech posted a number of crude tweets targeting Meyers, calling Meyers an "untalented piece of shit" and "monumental asshole" who "only has his job because he regularly gargled Lorne Michaels’ balls." The Daily Beast described Domenech's behavior as him having gone "on an unhinged rant agsinst the late-night host... that was at times homophobic." Domenech later deleted his tweets and apologized for "rage tweeting".[59][60]

During the coronavirus pandemic, The Federalist published numerous articles, many of them written by Domenech himself, that contained false information or information that was contrary to the recommendations of public health experts and authorities.[61][62] The Federalist published articles denouncing social distancing, and others claiming that fears over the coronavirus pandemic had been overhyped by the Democratic Party and the media. The Federalist co-founder Sean Davis wrote that Democrats were intentionally trying to "destroy the economy" as a "last-ditch 2020 play" because "all they care about is power. And if they have to destroy your life and business to get power back, they will."[62][63]

Domenech also published a piece, entitled "How Medical ‘Chickenpox Parties’ Could Turn The Tide Of The Wuhan Virus," by an individual identified as a physician in Oregon who recommended that people hold "chickenpox"-style parties for the coronavirus to build herd immunity, recommendations contrary to those of virtually all mainstream public health experts. "Given the recent example of spring break 2020 for college students in Florida, one could imagine such gatherings even becoming a social activity," the author, Doug Perednia wrote. Pedrednia, a former dermatologist, had been a businessman for the past 25 years, during which time he had not practiced medicine, and also allowed his medical license to lapse.[62][64][65][66] The Federalist was subsequently temporarily suspended from Twitter because the website, Twitter said, had used its platform to promote fringe ideas that contradicted public health experts and were harmful to public health.[65]

In June 2020, Google Ads warned The Federalist that it was considering demonetizing the website because of racism in its comment section; The Federalist removed the comments Google objected to, and Google announced that "no action will be taken".[67][68] In response, Domenech said: "We are really learning the degree to which Big Tech can be weaponized by woke mobs, or woke journalists in this case, to try to shut down places who disagree with their leftist agenda."[69]
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ben_Domen ... troversies

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Doc
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Re: Consider the possibility we are led by idiots

Post by Doc » Thu Jun 03, 2021 10:46 am

Milo wrote:
Thu Jun 03, 2021 9:38 am
Doc wrote:
Wed Jun 02, 2021 6:01 pm
Consider the possibility that Ben Domenech is an idiot.



So you are a science denier now?

https://www.newsweek.com/fauci-emails-5 ... ns-1596714
Fauci Emails: 5 Biggest Revelations

1. A Bill Gates adviser was worried about Fauci's health

2. Fauci offered support to a Chinese health official

3. Experts worried that COVID-19 could 'look engineered'

4. Fauci said that store-bought masks are 'not really effective'

5. Fauci was uncomfortable with people's fascination with him
“"I fancied myself as some kind of god....It is a sort of disease when you consider yourself some kind of god, the creator of everything, but I feel comfortable about it now since I began to live it out.” -- George Soros

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Milo
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Joined: Thu Dec 15, 2016 10:14 pm

Re: Consider the possibility we are led by idiots

Post by Milo » Thu Jun 03, 2021 11:06 am

Doc wrote:
Thu Jun 03, 2021 10:46 am
Milo wrote:
Thu Jun 03, 2021 9:38 am
Doc wrote:
Wed Jun 02, 2021 6:01 pm
Consider the possibility that Ben Domenech is an idiot.



So you are a science denier now?

https://www.newsweek.com/fauci-emails-5 ... ns-1596714
Fauci Emails: 5 Biggest Revelations

1. A Bill Gates adviser was worried about Fauci's health

2. Fauci offered support to a Chinese health official

3. Experts worried that COVID-19 could 'look engineered'

4. Fauci said that store-bought masks are 'not really effective'

5. Fauci was uncomfortable with people's fascination with him
My point being the college dropout serial plagiarist is not in a position to call anyone else an idiot.

As to snooping on people’s emails to play gotcha, that sort of People Magazine politics doesn’t interest me. Next they’ll be asking who wore it better.

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Doc
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Re: Consider the possibility we are led by idiots

Post by Doc » Thu Jun 03, 2021 1:30 pm

Milo wrote:
Thu Jun 03, 2021 11:06 am
Doc wrote:
Thu Jun 03, 2021 10:46 am
Milo wrote:
Thu Jun 03, 2021 9:38 am
Doc wrote:
Wed Jun 02, 2021 6:01 pm
Consider the possibility that Ben Domenech is an idiot.



So you are a science denier now?

https://www.newsweek.com/fauci-emails-5 ... ns-1596714
Fauci Emails: 5 Biggest Revelations

1. A Bill Gates adviser was worried about Fauci's health

2. Fauci offered support to a Chinese health official

3. Experts worried that COVID-19 could 'look engineered'

4. Fauci said that store-bought masks are 'not really effective'

5. Fauci was uncomfortable with people's fascination with him
My point being the college dropout serial plagiarist is not in a position to call anyone else an idiot.

As to snooping on people’s emails to play gotcha, that sort of People Magazine politics doesn’t interest me. Next they’ll be asking who wore it better.
"Snooping on people's emails"? These emails were released through a Freedom of information Act request. Because they are official government records. As citizens we have a right to know the contents of them. No snooping involved. PERIOD.
“"I fancied myself as some kind of god....It is a sort of disease when you consider yourself some kind of god, the creator of everything, but I feel comfortable about it now since I began to live it out.” -- George Soros

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Milo
Posts: 3272
Joined: Thu Dec 15, 2016 10:14 pm

Re: Consider the possibility we are led by idiots

Post by Milo » Thu Jun 03, 2021 7:28 pm

Doc wrote:
Thu Jun 03, 2021 1:30 pm
Milo wrote:
Thu Jun 03, 2021 11:06 am
Doc wrote:
Thu Jun 03, 2021 10:46 am
Milo wrote:
Thu Jun 03, 2021 9:38 am
Doc wrote:
Wed Jun 02, 2021 6:01 pm
Consider the possibility that Ben Domenech is an idiot.



So you are a science denier now?

https://www.newsweek.com/fauci-emails-5 ... ns-1596714
Fauci Emails: 5 Biggest Revelations

1. A Bill Gates adviser was worried about Fauci's health

2. Fauci offered support to a Chinese health official

3. Experts worried that COVID-19 could 'look engineered'

4. Fauci said that store-bought masks are 'not really effective'

5. Fauci was uncomfortable with people's fascination with him
My point being the college dropout serial plagiarist is not in a position to call anyone else an idiot.

As to snooping on people’s emails to play gotcha, that sort of People Magazine politics doesn’t interest me. Next they’ll be asking who wore it better.
"Snooping on people's emails"? These emails were released through a Freedom of information Act request. Because they are official government records. As citizens we have a right to know the contents of them. No snooping involved. PERIOD.
That they were released under a legal process doesn't make the gossip column approach less slimey or superficial.

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Doc
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Joined: Thu Dec 15, 2016 7:09 pm
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Re: Consider the possibility we are led by idiots

Post by Doc » Thu Jun 03, 2021 10:18 pm

Milo wrote:
Thu Jun 03, 2021 7:28 pm
Doc wrote:
Thu Jun 03, 2021 1:30 pm
Milo wrote:
Thu Jun 03, 2021 11:06 am
Doc wrote:
Thu Jun 03, 2021 10:46 am
Milo wrote:
Thu Jun 03, 2021 9:38 am
Doc wrote:
Wed Jun 02, 2021 6:01 pm
Consider the possibility that Ben Domenech is an idiot.



So you are a science denier now?

https://www.newsweek.com/fauci-emails-5 ... ns-1596714
Fauci Emails: 5 Biggest Revelations

1. A Bill Gates adviser was worried about Fauci's health

2. Fauci offered support to a Chinese health official

3. Experts worried that COVID-19 could 'look engineered'

4. Fauci said that store-bought masks are 'not really effective'

5. Fauci was uncomfortable with people's fascination with him
My point being the college dropout serial plagiarist is not in a position to call anyone else an idiot.

As to snooping on people’s emails to play gotcha, that sort of People Magazine politics doesn’t interest me. Next they’ll be asking who wore it better.
"Snooping on people's emails"? These emails were released through a Freedom of information Act request. Because they are official government records. As citizens we have a right to know the contents of them. No snooping involved. PERIOD.
That they were released under a legal process doesn't make the gossip column approach less slimey or superficial.
They are official government documents BY LAW and the public has every right to see them to know that Dr Faucistime created a monster. ;)

Wait for it....



BTW I don't remember you ever objecting to any illegal leak out of the Trump white house.
“"I fancied myself as some kind of god....It is a sort of disease when you consider yourself some kind of god, the creator of everything, but I feel comfortable about it now since I began to live it out.” -- George Soros

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Doc
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Joined: Thu Dec 15, 2016 7:09 pm
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Re: Consider the possibility we are led by idiots

Post by Doc » Fri Jun 04, 2021 8:04 am

The wait for Fauci's book tour seems to have been extended..

https://www.amazon.com/Fauci-Science-Co ... B086C33Y64

Fauci: The Bernie Madoff of Science and the HIV Ponzi Scheme that Concealed the Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Epidemic Paperback – March 23, 2020

Oh Wait wrong book


https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/technolo ... ar-AAKF78A

Dr. Anthony Fauci Book Scrubbed From Amazon After Email Dump
“"I fancied myself as some kind of god....It is a sort of disease when you consider yourself some kind of god, the creator of everything, but I feel comfortable about it now since I began to live it out.” -- George Soros

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Doc
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Joined: Thu Dec 15, 2016 7:09 pm
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Re: Consider the possibility we are led by idiots

Post by Doc » Fri Jun 04, 2021 9:34 am

https://www.mediaite.com/news/former-cd ... ak-theory/
Ex-CDC Director Robert Redfield Says He Received Death Threats From SCIENTISTS After Embracing Wuhan Lab Leak Theory
By Rudy TakalaJun 3rd, 2021, 11:58 am


Former Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Dr. Robert Redfield said he received “death threats” from other scientists for broaching the possibility that Covid-19 leaked from a laboratory in Wuhan, China.

The former CDC director said the threats came after a March 26 CNN interview, when he told the network, “I am of the point of view that I still think the most likely etiology of this pathogen in Wuhan was from a laboratory, you know, escaped.”

Redfield disclosed in a Vanity Fair interview published on Thursday that he “received death threats from fellow scientists” for the comment. “After the interview aired, death threats flooded his inbox,” the publication noted. “The vitriol came not just from strangers who thought he was being racially insensitive but also from prominent scientists, some of whom used to be his friends. One said he should just ‘wither and die.'”

The notion that Covid-19 may have originated in the Wuhan Institute of Virology was a subject of brief examination by the media in the early part of the pandemic. But media outlets quickly developed a more combative stance on the topic, with organizations including The Washington Post and National Public Radio insisting the theory had been “debunked.” However, last month’s revelation that the U.S. intelligence community learned three of the lab’s scientists became ill with symptoms consistent with Covid-19 in October 2019 — well before China began cooperating with world health officials — sparked renewed interest in the origins of the virus, and prompted President Joe Biden to issue a statement saying he had asked intelligence officials to “redouble” their investigation into the matter.

“I was threatened and ostracized because I proposed another hypothesis,” Redfield lamented in Thursday’s interview. “I expected it from politicians. I didn’t expect it from science.”
“"I fancied myself as some kind of god....It is a sort of disease when you consider yourself some kind of god, the creator of everything, but I feel comfortable about it now since I began to live it out.” -- George Soros

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Doc
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Re: Consider the possibility we are led by idiots

Post by Doc » Sat Jun 05, 2021 10:08 pm

https://theconservativetreehouse.com/20 ... ry-9-2017/
Interesting Timing – Obama Administration Lifted Block on “Gain of Function Research” Just Eleven Days Before President Trump Took Office, January 9, 2017



https://obamawhitehouse.archives.gov/bl ... -oversight

Recommended Policy Guidance for Potential Pandemic Pathogen Care and Oversight

January 9, 2017 at 9:06 AM ET by .


Summary:
OSTP Issues “Recommended Policy Guidance for Departmental Development of Review Mechanisms for Potential Pandemic Pathogen Care and Oversight (P3CO)"

Today, the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) is releasing “Recommended Policy Guidance for Departmental Development of Review Mechanisms for Potential Pandemic Pathogen Care and Oversight (P3CO).” Adoption of these recommendations will satisfy the requirements for lifting the current moratorium on certain life sciences research that could enhance a pathogen’s virulence and/or transmissibility to produce a potential pandemic pathogen (an enhanced PPP).

Issuance of this policy guidance concludes the deliberative process launched in October 2014 by OSTP and the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). At that time, OSTP and HHS asked the National Science Advisory Board for Biosecurity (NSABB), as informed by feedback from the National Research Council of the National Academy of Sciences, to provide recommendations to help shape the development and adoption of a new United States Government policy governing the funding and conduct of this category of research. While NSABB deliberated, such projects were placed on pause.

In May 2016, after thorough deliberation and extensive input from domestic and international stakeholders, the NSABB issued its recommendations. NSABB’s central finding was that studies that are expected to enhance PPP have potential benefits to public health but also entail significant risks. NSABB recommended that such studies warranted additional scrutiny prior to being funded. NSABB further recommended a Department-level, multi-disciplinary review and ongoing Federal and institutional oversight for this category of research. The recommended policy guidance that OSTP is issuing today will implement this approach.

In particular, the recommended policy guidance implements the NSABB’s call for a pre-funding review mechanism for certain research proposals. Toward that end, the policy guidance recommends that Federal departments and agencies establish appropriate review processes if they plan to fund studies anticipated to create, transport, or use enhanced PPP. In their reviews, Departments and agencies are asked to establish that such projects satisfy eight specified principles, to assess the projects’ risks and benefits, and to develop risk mitigation plans that are commensurate with the projects’ risks. They are also requested to report the outcome of any such reviews to the OSTP Director, along with the associated risk-benefit analyses and risk mitigation plans.

Projects that have been paused under the existing moratorium will now be reviewed utilizing a process consistent with the recommended policy guidance. Any projects that are determined suitable to proceed will do so with appropriate risk mitigation measures in place.

HHS is also committing to additional actions. First, HHS will ask the NSABB to continue to provide advice on the oversight of the creation, transport, or use of enhanced PPP. After HHS has reviewed its paused projects and made decisions about whether and how those projects will proceed, NSABB will review the process employed by HHS and provide advice, if necessary. Continued NSABB input will be essential to ensuring robust oversight of these projects. Further, discussing the department-level review process with NSABB will promote transparency and provide valuable forums for continued public dialogue.

Second, given that studies involving enhanced PPP are often described as “dual use” research, HHS is currently conducting a review of the implementation of policies for the oversight of dual use research of concern (DURC). HHS has asked NSABB to host a series of regional stakeholder meetings to gather information about the implementation of the DURC policies, and it will also solicit feedback more broadly related to their implementation.

Policy development in this important area of research will be ongoing. OSTP and HHS will continue to examine implementation of the policies and procedures that are developed to provide oversight of enhanced PPP, and they will continue to engage the public along the way.
“"I fancied myself as some kind of god....It is a sort of disease when you consider yourself some kind of god, the creator of everything, but I feel comfortable about it now since I began to live it out.” -- George Soros

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