China and the US

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Sertorio
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China and the US

Post by Sertorio » Thu Dec 10, 2020 4:40 am

America Surrenders to China
by Brandon Weichert

https://www.realclearpolitics.com/artic ... 44805.html

The United States is mired in a succession crisis. There is much loose talk about another civil war erupting between supporters of President-elect Joe Biden and President Donald Trump. As this occurs, America’s enemies act boldly against U.S. interests. Each precious moment wasted on deciding which septuagenarian won the White House in November is another moment that the Chinese Communist Party continues its long march to global dominance.

China’s dominance will not come at first in the form of military conquest. Beijing is very much a 21st century power, and its program for displacing the United States will look far different from what the Soviet Union tried during the Cold War. Chinese dominance will be brought on by superior trade, industrial, and technological development practices.

Beijing recently signed a revolutionary free trade alliance with several Asian powers—including Australia—meant to increase China’s influence over the Indo-Pacific and diminish Washington’s hard-won influence there. China announced it had achieved quantum supremacy—a lodestar for whichever country or company seeks to pioneer quantum computing. Many technologists, like Scott Amyx, have previously argued that quantum computing could be as disruptive to the world economy as the cotton gin or automobile were. Whoever dominates this new industry will write humanity’s future.

And then there’s the new space race between the United States and China. Private launch companies, including SpaceX, have revolutionized America’s overall space sector. But the lack of political vision or leadership means that real gains for America in space will be slowly realized, if ever. President Trump was the only American leader in decades who seemed to understand the promises and challenges of space. Yet, the rest of the government never fully embraced Trump’s robust space program. Now, it may be too late.

NASA’s Artemis Program, which is supposed to return Americans to the moon, is adrift, stuck in what Hollywood types might call “development hell.” Petty politics, budgetary constraints, and bureaucratic inertia have prevented this essential program from lifting off in a timely way. Judging from the profile of the individuals that President-elect Biden chose for his NASA transition team, it looks as though the Artemis program will be reduced even more in importance.

Meanwhile, the Chinese have not only landed a rover on the dark side of the moon, but they have now successfully retrieved lunar rocks—the first time in decades that this has been done. China’s leadership does not intend to stop with unmanned missions to the moon. The recent Chang’e-5 mission (launch rocket pictured above) was merely the proof that China has achieved the same capabilities as the Americans.

Now, China will outpace America. Two years ago, Ye Peijian, the head of China’s lunar mission, declared that China’s leaders viewed the moon as they do the South China Sea, with Mars being analogous to Huangyan Island. Meanwhile, NASA is reduced to begging for money to create new spacesuits for its lunar mission.

Compare these events today to the Cold War. In the Cold War between the United States and the Soviet Union, the competition between the two superpowers was visceral and the stakes were existential. There was no area of human life where the conflict did not play out … and where the combatants did not fight with everything they had to win.

When the Soviet Union beat the Americans by getting humanity’s first satellite in orbit—Sputnik—most Americans and their leaders rightly panicked. By the time the USSR placed the first human in orbit, America’s leaders knew that they could not simply shrug and lazily say, “We’ll get there eventually, too.”

This lackadaisical attitude that yesteryear’s Americans quickly overcame, however, is precisely how the Americans have responded to China’s impressive gains over the last few years. Denialism will not preserve America’s superpower status. Decisive political action will. America’s leaders, however, are still bickering with each other over petty partisan politics. Xi Jinping and China’s leaders laugh and march on.

Had it not been for the virile leadership of John F. Kennedy and his declaration at Rice University in 1962 that the United States would send the first humans to the moon by the end of that decade, the Soviets would have defeated the Americans in the moon race as well. Had that occurred, history for the rest of the Cold War would have played out differently. The spin-off technology that the Apollo program provided the United States might never have been realized in America. Instead, those impressive gains would gone to the USSR … and the inevitable implosion of the Soviet Union might have not happened.

Between China’s breakthrough in quantum supremacy and its successful lunar missions—as well as its clearly defined strategy for achieving dominance in both the high-tech sector and in space—the American leaders have ignored multiple Sputnik moments. China now has momentum in this new cold war. America’s political instability is only exacerbating these frightening trends.

What’s needed now is a bipartisan commitment to investing in the technology and capabilities that will allow for the United States to leapfrog the Chinese in critical areas, including quantum computing. American leaders must also ensure that the United States remains the dominant space power by permanently placing astronauts on the moon and Mars, and by deploying defensive space weapons above the Earth.

As an investor from China once told me, “When the donkey and elephant make war upon each other, few in your country benefit.” The bitter partisan divide in America today is a strategic liability. This division will affect the trade, economic, technology, and space policies of this country—at a time when consistency and bipartisan leadership is needed in all these areas. Until we recognize China’s threat and rally as one nation, America’s surrender to China in the new cold war is assured.
If we were in 1960 maybe the US could respond to China's challenge, but present day America is completely powerless to face that challenge. Deeply divided and maybe about to become two or three separate countries, the US may still have some military power but is no longer capable of defeating China, unless it chooses to commit suicide by using nuclear weapons. Like so many past empires, the US will be destroyed by the demands imposed by its empire. Remaining an empire is costing the US so much money that the country is about to collapse on both economic and social spheres. And like so many past empires, the US has no clue about what is happening to it. The whole process doesn't bother me at all, except for the potential suicidal impulses of the collapsing empire and its consequences for the rest of us.

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cassowary
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Re: China and the US

Post by cassowary » Wed Dec 23, 2020 9:18 pm

You see the world through Socialism tinted lenses, Sertorio. You don’t want to see the downfall of the CCP as what happened in Eastern Europe.

According to Marx, the people are supposed to overthrow capitalism and not Socialism. The revolutions that overthrew socialist governments shatter your dreams, your purpose in life.

You don’t care if a China led by the CCP is a threat to our freedoms. You don’t care for the millions of Christians, Muslims and Falungong wrongly imprisoned. You don’t care that there have credible reports about some of them killed for their organs.
The Imp :D

neverfail
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Re: China and the US

Post by neverfail » Thu Dec 24, 2020 12:58 am

cassowary wrote:
Wed Dec 23, 2020 9:18 pm
You see the world through Socialism tinted lenses, Sertorio. You don’t want to see the downfall of the CCP as what happened in Eastern Europe.

According to Marx, the people are supposed to overthrow capitalism and not Socialism. The revolutions that overthrew socialist governments shatter your dreams, your purpose in life.

You don’t care if a China led by the CCP is a threat to our freedoms. You don’t care for the millions of Christians, Muslims and Falungong wrongly imprisoned. You don’t care that there have credible reports about some of them killed for their organs.
Just as you see the World around you through your own twisted, idealogically loaded refracting lense.

It is like your bloody cheek to accuse others of the very sin you yourself are guilty of Cassowary.

neverfail
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Re: China and the US

Post by neverfail » Thu Dec 24, 2020 1:10 am

Sertorio wrote:
Thu Dec 10, 2020 4:40 am

If we were in 1960 maybe the US could respond to China's challenge, but present day America is completely powerless to face that challenge. Deeply divided and maybe about to become two or three separate countries, the US may still have some military power but is no longer capable of defeating China, unless it chooses to commit suicide by using nuclear weapons. Like so many past empires, the US will be destroyed by the demands imposed by its empire. Remaining an empire is costing the US so much money that the country is about to collapse on both economic and social spheres. And like so many past empires, the US has no clue about what is happening to it. The whole process doesn't bother me at all, except for the potential suicidal impulses of the collapsing empire and its consequences for the rest of us.
Alarmist nonsense?

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cassowary
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Re: China and the US

Post by cassowary » Thu Dec 24, 2020 1:49 am

neverfail wrote:
Thu Dec 24, 2020 12:58 am
cassowary wrote:
Wed Dec 23, 2020 9:18 pm
You see the world through Socialism tinted lenses, Sertorio. You don’t want to see the downfall of the CCP as what happened in Eastern Europe.

According to Marx, the people are supposed to overthrow capitalism and not Socialism. The revolutions that overthrew socialist governments shatter your dreams, your purpose in life.

You don’t care if a China led by the CCP is a threat to our freedoms. You don’t care for the millions of Christians, Muslims and Falungong wrongly imprisoned. You don’t care that there have credible reports about some of them killed for their organs.
Just as you see the World around you through your own twisted, idealogically loaded refracting lense.

It is like your bloody cheek to accuse others of the very sin you yourself are guilty of Cassowary.
Me? Want I see is the truth Neverfail.
The Imp :D

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cassowary
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Re: China and the US

Post by cassowary » Thu Dec 24, 2020 5:14 am

cassowary wrote:
Thu Dec 24, 2020 1:49 am
neverfail wrote:
Thu Dec 24, 2020 12:58 am
cassowary wrote:
Wed Dec 23, 2020 9:18 pm
You see the world through Socialism tinted lenses, Sertorio. You don’t want to see the downfall of the CCP as what happened in Eastern Europe.

According to Marx, the people are supposed to overthrow capitalism and not Socialism. The revolutions that overthrew socialist governments shatter your dreams, your purpose in life.

You don’t care if a China led by the CCP is a threat to our freedoms. You don’t care for the millions of Christians, Muslims and Falungong wrongly imprisoned. You don’t care that there have credible reports about some of them killed for their organs.
Just as you see the World around you through your own twisted, idealogically loaded refracting lense.

It is like your bloody cheek to accuse others of the very sin you yourself are guilty of Cassowary.
Me? Want I see is the truth Neverfail.
Oops. Typo. What I see is the truth, Neverfail.
The Imp :D

Jim the Moron
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Re: China and the US

Post by Jim the Moron » Thu Dec 24, 2020 5:40 pm

Did Xi Jinping drop the ball?

https://scmp.com/news/china/diplomacy/a ... ps-us-left

"In early 2017, if China had simply maintained a steady hand in foreign and domestic policy, it could have very well become a true global leader in the US's Trump imposed absence."

neverfail
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Re: China and the US

Post by neverfail » Fri Dec 25, 2020 3:24 pm

cassowary wrote:
Thu Dec 24, 2020 5:14 am
What I see is the truth, Neverfail.
Then why don't you publish it?

neverfail
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Re: China and the US

Post by neverfail » Fri Dec 25, 2020 4:33 pm

Jim the Moron wrote:
Thu Dec 24, 2020 5:40 pm
Did Xi Jinping drop the ball?

https://scmp.com/news/china/diplomacy/a ... ps-us-left

"In early 2017, if China had simply maintained a steady hand in foreign and domestic policy, it could have very well become a true global leader in the US's Trump imposed absence."
Thanks for that link Jim.

So right that foreign policy is the stepchild of domestic politics.

Xi Jinpeng (even men with dictatorial powers have constituencies they like to play up to) very likely has hundreds of admirers in his country who want reassurance that "China is stronjg and powerful" - unlike back in those bygone days if their country's century of humuliation.

Well, it seems that the USA has tens of millions of armchair "wolf warrior" alpha male types who likewise get a kick from news that their government is pushing other countries perceived to be in emnity with thye United States. Some are not even passive armchair warriors but extreme right wing active militants, white supremist types etc. Trump appealed to this very element which formed a significent part of his voter support base.

Bush II, with the terrorist assault on the NY Twin Towers in the immediate past, appealed to this same vacuous minded crowd by inagurating the futile 2003 invasion of Iraq. Wrong target - Saddam Hussein had nothing to do with Al Quita or the attack on the twin towers - but he still made a nice, juicy scapegoat given that the wolf-warrior deadheads within the Republican Party constituency would have been too blockhead ignorent to tell the difference.

Which brings me to Joe Biden. He indeed on the eve of his presidental inaguration comes across as the conciliatory best man to repair most (not all) of the damage done over the past 4 years by the Trump administration to America's system of international alliances. Each old ally restored and reassured and new ally recruited to the cause represents a further strengthing for the United States along with an additional setback for the PRC. Something that apparently Trump was far too thick to comprehend.

There is however a danger involved. The first part is the "Obama curse" of appearing to be "too soft" on China. Obama inagurated some good policies but suffered political loss even among his own constituents because of poor PR communication. The second risk is that Biden might at some point respond to media and public howling for blood by borrowing a leaf from the Trump?bush copybook at a time in his administration's dealings with China when US interests would be better served by giving some ground to his overseas adversary.

Xi Jinpeng did indeed stand tall at Davos in January 2017 and posture as the champion of international free trade. But beware of chinamen bearing enticing messages like that. When any representative of the CCP calls for free trade the unstated, duplicitious subscript seems to be you open up your markets to us but we do not feelo under the same obligation to do the same for you.

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cassowary
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Re: China and the US

Post by cassowary » Fri Dec 25, 2020 5:41 pm

neverfail wrote:
Fri Dec 25, 2020 3:24 pm
cassowary wrote:
Thu Dec 24, 2020 5:14 am
What I see is the truth, Neverfail.
Then why don't you publish it?
That’s what I did here.
The Imp :D

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