Bernie Sanders

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Sertorio
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Bernie Sanders

Post by Sertorio » Sat Feb 01, 2020 6:09 pm

Leading by 9 in New Iowa Poll, Sanders Says His Campaign Is 'Worst Nightmare' of Trump and Billionaire Class
byJake Johnson

"We are their worst nightmare," Sen. Bernie Sanders said Sunday of the corporate and establishment forces allied against his presidential campaign—and the diverse grassroots movement fueling it—as a new Iowa poll showed the Vermont senator leading the 2020 Democratic field by nine points just a week ahead of the state's Feb. 3 caucuses.

The Emerson/7 News survey released Sunday evening put Sanders at the top of the Democratic pack with 30% support, solidifying his status as frontrunner in the state. Former Vice President Joe Biden polled in second with 21% support and Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.) in third with 13%.

"Compared to the Emerson Poll of Iowa in December, Sanders has picked up the most support, rising eight points," noted Emerson data analyst Isabel Holloway. "Biden has lost two points, Klobuchar has moved up three points, and Warren has dropped one point. Buttigieg has lost the most support, falling eight points. Yang and Gabbard have each risen by three points, and Steyer has moved up two points."

The survey, one of several strong early-state polls for Sanders in recent days, came as the Vermont senator rallied in Iowa alongside progressive Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.), who officially endorsed Sanders before a crowd of tens of thousands in New York City last October.

During an event in Sioux City, Iowa Sunday evening, Sanders pointed out that President Donald Trump and the Republican National Committee are suddenly "talking about our campaign."

Ahead of Sanders' weekend rallies, Trump's reelection campaign sent an email to supporters describing Ocasio-Cortez's endorsement of Sanders as "problematic" and calling the Vermont senator "the godfather of her extreme agenda and socialist vision for America."

Trump and his Republican allies aren't the only ones nervous about the possibility of a Sanders nomination, the senator told the large crowd gathered in Sioux City Sunday night.

"Suddenly, we have the Democratic establishment very nervous about this campaign," Sanders declared to applause. "We got Wall Street nervous. We got the insurance companies nervous. We got the drug companies nervous. We got the fossil fuel industry nervous. We got the military-industrial complex nervous. We got the prison-industrial complex nervous. We got billionaires going on television crying that they're going to have to start paying their fair share of taxes."

"And they're starting to think, 'Could this really happen? Could there really be a political movement in America which brings together blacks and whites and Latinos and Asian Americans and Native Americans, gay and straight, to stand up as working class people fighting for change?'" Sanders said. "We are their worst nightmare."

Speaking at a rally in Ames, Iowa Saturday, Ocasio-Cortez emphasized the importance of large voter turnout in what she described as "one of the most consequential election years that we have had in recent history."

"Are we ready to caucus our hearts out?" Ocasio-Cortez asked the cheering crowd of Sanders supporters. "I'm so excited to be here and share in this moment with you all, shoulder to shoulder. Because this is not just a moment, it's a movement. It's a true movement."

https://www.commondreams.org/news/2020/ ... -trump-and
Were I American, I would still prefer Tulsi Gabbard, but Sanders raises some interesting possibilities...

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lzzrdgrrl
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Re: Bernie Sanders

Post by lzzrdgrrl » Sat Feb 01, 2020 7:48 pm

I have a certain notoriety among the lesser gods........

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Milo
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Re: Bernie Sanders

Post by Milo » Sat Feb 01, 2020 11:01 pm

Feel the Bern!

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Sertorio
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Re: Bernie Sanders

Post by Sertorio » Sun Feb 02, 2020 10:33 am

Can Bernie and Tulsi Survive Hillary’s ‘Urge’ to Save the DNC?
by Tom Luongo - February 1, 2020

For months now I’ve been convinced that Hillary Clinton will be entering the fray that is the Democratic Party primary season. The affair to date has been a nothing short of high comedy.

Recent events have me more convinced than ever that she will be returning, like some zombie whose head we forgot to cut off, to haunt voters one more time this fall.

After the beginning of an obvious (and planned) PR campaign last week with the release of a big campaign ad documentary on Netflix and a big splash in the Hollywood Reporter Hillary finally stopped being coy. And she announced this week that she now ‘has the urge’ to run again against Donald Trump.

Save us, please, from Hillary’s urges…. Shudder.

And she did so making sure that everyone knew what she thought of the real front-runner for the nomination, Bernie Sanders.

As various anointed ones have dropped out of the race – Kamala Harris, Cory Booker, Robert O’Rourke – others have faltered despite huge ad spends while the media and pollsters do their level best to convince us all that Joe Biden’s a serious candidate to take on Donald Trump this fall.

In fact, the only reason Biden is still in the race is to make the impeachment theater going on right now seem relevant and cogent. But, like Biden himself, it is neither.

Then again neither is Hillary, but never underestimate this woman’s narcissistic solipsism.

If you look back on the race to date it’s clear that most of the people running are there to try and distract voters away from the two candidates that resonate most with voters, Bernie Sanders and Tulsi Gabbard.

Yes, Gabbard is polling low but if you look at poll numbers versus money spent and/or raised to this point, she’s clearly got cache and the ability to build a real following. And as the field shrinks those distractions become irrelevant. Her poll numbers are rising the more the field winnows.

Neither of them is acceptable in any way to the DNC. They are outsiders within their party. I’m no fan of Bernie Sanders. In fact, I think he’s a terrible candidate — because, you know, commie! — but that’s not the point of this article.

Bernie is surging in the early states and panic is setting in with the DNC. And they must have a plan to stop him from running away with the nomination otherwise we could have two outsiders headlining this fall’s reality show.

And that plan starts with the impeachment and potential removal of Donald Trump.

The impeachment is a distraction for Trump but it is a real problem for the Senators running for the Democratic nomination. They have to spend all day listening to Adam Schiff and Jerry Nadler lie while they could be out campaigning and raising money.

This hurts Bernie the most because Bernie is the one who will get zero help from the DNC’s big donors. None of them are behind him and with good reason. He’s hostile to most of them (and most of us as well, but that’s a different article).

Of the people running for President as Democrats the only person less acceptable to Wall St. than Elizabeth Warren is Bernie Sanders. Warren’s entire campaign has been designed to push Bernie farther left by out-lefting him at every turn. Bernie says 70% top marginal tax rate, Warren says 77%. Bernie wants debt restructuring? Warren says forgive all student loan debt.

Her job is to make Bernie as unacceptable to mainstream U.S. voters as possible. Unfortunately, that makes Bernie more and more acceptable to a lot of people voting in the Democratic primaries. And this Catch-22 is beginning to show up in the polls for Iowa and New Hampshire.

Then there’s the serious money behind Pete Buttigieg trying to create slightly gayer version of Barack Obama. Again, he’s just another distraction to suck support away from Sanders and keep the field relatively close and the odds of an uncommitted primary season high.

Because the goal is to get to a brokered convention this summer. So, the impeachment was slowed down to hurt Sanders, Warren and Amy Klobuchar and help give Biden the bump he needs to get some momentum coming into Iowa.

It’s not working.

But I also don’t think it’s going to matter. If you keep watching the headlines the attack dogs are out in full to discredit and hurt Sanders. They know he’s a real force to be reckoned with. And worse, his attack dog, Gabbard, has been muzzled by keeping her off the debate stage so she can’t take anyone else out, like she roasted that pig Kamala Harris last summer.

But I truly feel the DNC is looking to steal the nomination again from Sanders. And the impeachment of Trump continues to somehow, against all odds, get worse for him, even though his party is supposed to be in charge of the proceedings.

I told everyone back in September when Nancy Pelosi announced she was going through with the impeachment process that this was all about getting rid of Trump. But it was in October when Hillary went after Tulsi Gabbard that Gabbard’s response was beyond epic and I wrote about it then.

Gabbard throws down the gauntlet here outing Hillary as the mastermind behind the DNC strategy of allowing the current crop of future losers to fall all over themselves to alienate as many centrist voters as possible.

This paves the way for Hillary to swoop in on her broom, pointed hat in hand, and declare herself the savior of the Democratic Party’s chances to defeat Donald Trump next November.

So, Hillary’s running, the DNC is trying to stop Bernie and Tulsi Gabbard is still an also-ran in New Hampshire and Iowa, polling between 5% and 7%. So what?

Well, I feel at this point it’s been game-planned by Gabbard and Sanders that they know what’s coming. I felt the endorsement from Joe Rogan of Sanders was timed to distract from Hillary’s attack on Bernie in that Hollywood Reporter piece.

Rogan is far more influential than the dead tree media Hillary’s publicist works with. And her attack dogs were out in full to attack Rogan and smear Sanders with their typical guilt-by-association nonsense.

I don’t tweet much folks, but this one gets to the truth of what’s going on in the murk and slime of Democratic Party politics.

If you ever wanted proof that hyper-sensitive identity politics was nothing more than a cheap political tool of the worst kind. I give you Joe Rogan is a Nazi.

Sanders and Gabbard know the DNC is out to destroy him. And the question then becomes what’s next?

What do they do to combat this? Gabbard is not running for re-election in Hawaii. She says she’s committed to running for President. I don’t think she’s getting the nomination and, frankly, I don’t think she is either.

She just filed a defamation of character lawsuit against Hillary for the smears Hillary threw around I linked to above. She puts financial pressure on Hillary knowing that the Clintons couldn’t drum up support and dollars last year during their expensive speaking tour no one went to.

Gabbard denies any kind of third party run, getting the Ron Paul treatment from the media. But, she’s a very acceptable person to a lot of disaffected Trump voters like myself. She speaks to them and can help carry Bernie as his running mate if he somehow makes it through the convention to be the Democratic nominee.

So, yes, Gabbard isn’t running for re-election because she’s running as Sanders’ Vice-Presidential candidate.

And it may not be for the Democratic party in the end. That’s the part you have to factor in here.

Game-planning this out, these two are running a real insurgency within the DNC to either get the nomination or split off and run as Independents. This is Bernie’s last kick at the can. He’s already gotten the gold watch from the DNC in 2016, living the high life only a high member of the Politburo can.

Gabbard has burned all the bridges within the DNC she can, almost gleefully. That makes her a person of integrity, of authenticity, in a U.S. political wasteland of charlatans, reality show hucksters and outright thieves.

The quicker she climbs out of the basement in Pelosi’s House, the better off she’ll be.

I don’t put it past either of these people to think that preventing Hillary from regaining control of the Democrats and spoiling her return is the best outcome for America, even if it re-elects Donald Trump.

But, if Trump is removed to make way for Hillary, then the Race to 270 electoral votes becomes a non-binary affair.

https://www.strategic-culture.org/news/ ... e-the-dnc/
Interesting...

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Sertorio
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Re: Bernie Sanders

Post by Sertorio » Sun Feb 02, 2020 10:50 am

BERNIE SANDERS, THE DEMOCRATIC FRONT-RUNNER
By Benjamin Wallace-Wells - February 1, 2020


Bernie Sanders, at seventy-eight, three months clear of a heart attack, has outlived obscurity to become the co-front-runner for the Democratic nomination for the Presidency of the United States. He is still thin and intent; to my eye, the hunch in his back has deepened. On a tour of Iowa last weekend, he wore a suit with an open-necked shirt, and his hair was on the tame side of its range. There are not many jokes in Sanders’s speeches right now, or stories, or people. He addressed thousands of people in Iowa and did not take a single question.

The better Sanders’s polls look, the more grave, even dour, he seems to grow. “Our infrastructure, our roads, our bridges, our border systems, wastewater plants are crumbling,” he said, morosely, in Ames. His ballooning prospects were enough to excite his crowds; Sanders himself could deflate into a more familiar tone. Americans have to endure the “international embarrassment” of failing to guarantee health care. Did you want to “talk about vulgarity?” Consider the pharmaceutical executives, “a bunch of crooks.” Dispassionately, he went on to climate change. “They have underestimated the kinds of forest fires and wildfires that we will be seeing. All of you are aware that Australia, a beautiful country, is now burning.” The average American worker “is not making a nickel more” than he or she did fifty years ago, he said, and “you got three people on top owning more wealth than the bottom half of American society. You got that? Three people, a hundred and sixty million people.” Why, you wondered, would a person invest himself in such a sick place? The answer, carried by his young crowds and surrogates: for the kids.

It’s common to describe the present split within the Democratic Party as pitting its left against its center. A different way to put it is that the Party is split between its likely future and its current reality. An Emerson poll of Iowa this week found that forty-four per cent of Democrats under fifty support Sanders; ten per cent favor Elizabeth Warren, and no other candidate reached double digits. You’d think that a growing coalition of this size would be enticing to other Democrats, but Sanders has been endorsed by just one of his Senate colleagues, Patrick Leahy, of Vermont, and by seven members of the House. On Friday, he had the support of only one Iowa state legislator, while Amy Klobuchar had been endorsed by eighteen. “Nobody likes him,” Hillary Clinton says, of Sanders, in a new documentary just shown at Sundance, which seems true in a certain sense but beside the point. His voters no longer look quite so much like outsiders to the Party. They are beginning to seem like the future base. The former Treasury Secretary Larry Summers has been talking up an analysis that he and some associates conducted, which found that Sanders’s proposals would add sixty trillion dollars in new spending programs, about twenty per cent of G.D.P. That is more than fifty times the new spending proposed by Klobuchar, ten times that proposed by Joe Biden, and nearly twice that proposed by Warren. According to Summers, Sanders’s program is nearly three times the size of the New Deal. Sanders might quibble with the numbers, but the vast gap between the scale of his own programs and those of his rivals suggests something about why his supporters have been so hard for other Democrats to pull away. “In any other country, Joe Biden and I would not be in the same party,” Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Sanders’s most prominent surrogate, told New York magazine last month. At stake in Sanders’s primary campaign is whether the transformation of the Democrats has already begun.

Last Saturday, at Ames City Auditorium, Sanders, travelling with Ocasio-Cortez and the documentary filmmaker Michael Moore, drew a crowd of more than a thousand people, which meant that two hundred of them had to watch the rally from a gym out back. Moore went out to address them. “You’re like me, this is the slacker crowd!” Moore said. “We don’t show up two hours early for anything!” But, whatever the Sanders campaign is, it isn’t for slackers. Sanders knew from the outset of the race that he was likely to raise more money than any of his rivals, and he has—more than ninety-six million dollars so far, according to the campaign. His campaign manager, Faiz Shakir, is a former Harvard baseball player who trained in Harry Reid’s Senate office. His role in the Sanders operation is something like the one that Rahm Emanuel once played in the young Barack Obama’s: the figure in an idealistic campaign who understands something about power. Sanders’s campaign has a sharp slogan—“Not Me. Us.”—and branding that keeps pivoting, deftly, to match the news. In Iowa this past weekend, volunteers were wearing the latest buttons, which respond to questions about Sanders’s electability. They read, “Bernie Beats Trump.” Sanders’s platform is no less radical than it was in 2016, and his supporters’ siege mentality is undiminished. On Friday night, Rashida Tlaib, one of Sanders’s most outspoken surrogates, made headlines for booing a mention of Hillary Clinton at a campaign event. (Tlaib later apologized.) But Sanders’s movement, with all its bristling emotions, is also beginning to look like a winning one. At every level, there is an interesting tension, between powerlessness and power.

Early last Sunday morning, about a hundred campaign volunteers were waiting to meet Sanders at an office in a strip mall. As people milled around, with their winter gear still on, I tried to get a sense of what was different from 2016. The campaign operation was much bigger and better—everyone agreed on that. But mostly, they said, it was the same. “I honestly don’t think there’s a difference—I think it’s the same thing,” a woman named Celia Ringstrom told me. Sanders’s constancy, in the face of opportunism and hypocrisy from both Republicans and Democrats, was the point. “I mean, he’s been saying the same thing for forty years,” a man named Mike McElree told me. Sanders was on the good side of a contest between “democracy and barbarism,” an organizer told the group—with little, it seemed, between them.

Throughout the fall, a wise thing to say about the race was that Democrats in real life were not the same as they were on Twitter—that they were not as committed to socialism and social-justice claims, and not nearly so far to the left. Out in the real world, the line went, the Party was populated by a more sedate group—older, less educated, and less spikily progressive. They wanted a touch more public health insurance, a more balanced system of taxation, and a return to some remembered public decency—they were Biden people. In the week before the Iowa caucuses, though, the distinction between the Party on Twitter and the real world seemed to be collapsing. “I just don’t like rich people,” a woman named Sara Brizzi told me in Ankeny. “Maybe because of having grown up poor.” Brizzi, who was there with her husband and their five-year-old daughter, explained that she worked for a health-insurance company, and that, if Sanders won, and his Medicare for All plan was realized, she would probably lose her job. In 2016, pundits sometimes described the Sanders and Trump campaigns as reflecting a “symbolic” politics, in which policy positions mattered less than resisting the status quo. But the Sanders movement is profoundly material: its adherents want Medicare for All, and a Green New Deal, and tuition-free public colleges, and they have imagined these programs clearly enough that they have considered whether their own jobs might be affected. Brizzi had weighed the risks and benefits, and decided that she was with Sanders.

We are a long way from the start of this primary campaign, when a half-dozen candidates met with Obama, and went out to try to build a gentler bridge between the political needs of the present day—as the Party sees them—and the coalition of the future. The majority of those candidates—Cory Booker, Julián Castro, Beto O’Rourke, and Kamala Harris—are now out of the race, and two others, Pete Buttigieg and Warren, have seen their prospects weaken. In just a few weeks, Democrats may be left with a simple and stark choice between Biden and Sanders. In Iowa last week, the most powerful forces in the Democratic primary did not seem to be those massing behind Mike Bloomberg and Biden, but those affiliated with the Sanders bus speeding west across Iowa—the ninety-six million dollars and the multiracial coalition of the young behind it, who seemed to want what he was offering, and not, as he might have said, fifty cents on the dollar.

In icy, spare Perry, Iowa, last Sunday, Sanders’s audience was crammed into the town hall, and nearly ecstatic, but the more energetic that crowds are, the more focussed and concerned Sanders seems to become—an emotional contrarian. His mind seemed fixed on the short time until the caucuses, and the impeachment trial that would keep him in Washington, D.C. Sanders said, “I hope to come back—I don’t know if I will midweek. Maybe, maybe not.” A moment later, he seemed to decide—probably not—and slowed his cadence for a final message. Yes, this was about winning the nomination, he said, and yes, it was about beating Trump. “But we are asking even more of you. We are asking you to join us to transform this country.” The next event was in Fort Dodge. By the time I’d exited the building, the campaign bus was already gone. Sanders had said a few minutes earlier that he had enjoyed taking questions from Iowans through the campaign. “Today, we’re not going to have the time.”

https://www.newyorker.com/news/campaign ... ont-runner
Interesting...

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Milo
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Re: Bernie Sanders

Post by Milo » Sun Feb 02, 2020 8:57 pm

Only in America could Sanders be "radical".

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cassowary
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Re: Bernie Sanders

Post by cassowary » Sun Feb 02, 2020 9:24 pm

lzzrdgrrl wrote:
Sat Feb 01, 2020 7:48 pm
a
I don't agree with this guy. I think the American voter is not that much different from the British voter. That's because of the common language and culture. Neither nations are interested in bringing their country so far left as what Bernie Sanders and Jeremy Corbyn want. The far left has captured the Labour Party and the Far left is on the verge of capturing the Democratic Party. The Far Left got trounced in the UK and will also get trounced in the US.
The Imp :D

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Re: Bernie Sanders

Post by neverfail » Mon Feb 03, 2020 1:01 pm

cassowary wrote:
Sun Feb 02, 2020 9:24 pm

I don't agree with this guy. I think the American voter is not that much different from the British voter. That's because of the common language and culture. Neither nations are interested in bringing their country so far left as what Bernie Sanders and Jeremy Corbyn want. The far left has captured the Labour Party and the Far left is on the verge of capturing the Democratic Party. The Far Left got trounced in the UK and will also get trounced in the US.
If the British Labour Party does not get rid of Corbyn and shake itself loose from the grip of what he symbolizes then I have reason to believe it is facing electoral extinction. By contrast, a Saunders-Gaddard ticket as the alternative to another run by Hillary Clinton may very well be the tonic that both the Democrats Party (and America) need.

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Milo
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Re: Bernie Sanders

Post by Milo » Mon Feb 03, 2020 3:39 pm

neverfail wrote:
Mon Feb 03, 2020 1:01 pm
cassowary wrote:
Sun Feb 02, 2020 9:24 pm

I don't agree with this guy. I think the American voter is not that much different from the British voter. That's because of the common language and culture. Neither nations are interested in bringing their country so far left as what Bernie Sanders and Jeremy Corbyn want. The far left has captured the Labour Party and the Far left is on the verge of capturing the Democratic Party. The Far Left got trounced in the UK and will also get trounced in the US.
If the British Labour Party does not get rid of Corbyn and shake itself loose from the grip of what he symbolizes then I have reason to believe it is facing electoral extinction. By contrast, a Saunders-Gaddard ticket as the alternative to another run by Hillary Clinton may very well be the tonic that both the Democrats Party (and America) need.
I agree.

Conflating UK Labour with US left Democrats is just silly anyway. Singapore is already more socialist than the US too.

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cassowary
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Re: Bernie Sanders

Post by cassowary » Mon Feb 03, 2020 5:00 pm

neverfail wrote:
Mon Feb 03, 2020 1:01 pm
cassowary wrote:
Sun Feb 02, 2020 9:24 pm

I don't agree with this guy. I think the American voter is not that much different from the British voter. That's because of the common language and culture. Neither nations are interested in bringing their country so far left as what Bernie Sanders and Jeremy Corbyn want. The far left has captured the Labour Party and the Far left is on the verge of capturing the Democratic Party. The Far Left got trounced in the UK and will also get trounced in the US.
If the British Labour Party does not get rid of Corbyn and shake itself loose from the grip of what he symbolizes then I have reason to believe it is facing electoral extinction. By contrast, a Saunders-Gaddard ticket as the alternative to another run by Hillary Clinton may very well be the tonic that both the Democrats Party (and America) need.
If Sanders win the Presidency, he will ruin the country economically at the minimum. At worst, he becomes a dictator. His tolerance for revolutionary marxists in his team does not reflect well on his adherence to democracy.
The Imp :D

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