An Iranian missile shot down Ukrainian jet, Trudeau says

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neverfail
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An Iranian missile shot down Ukrainian jet, Trudeau says

Post by neverfail » Thu Jan 09, 2020 12:43 pm

The airliner was a Ukranian one. Ukraine is not an enemy state of the Islamic Republic - and there were Iranian passengers on board along with the Canadian victims. If true then it was more likely the work of a jittery Iranian missile ground crew convinced that the plane was a hostile US bomber aircraft out to retaliate for the Iranian missile strike on those US bases in Iraq.

More unintended victims of Trump's deliberate stoking up of tensions between the US and Iran?

Best for the Islamic Republic to come clean on this one?

https://www.thestar.com/politics/federa ... ation.html

(P.S. What the f*** does Trudeau hope to achieve by growing a beard?)

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Milo
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Re: An Iranian missile shot down Ukrainian jet, Trudeau says

Post by Milo » Thu Jan 09, 2020 2:45 pm

I can't shed any light on the beard thing.

Interesting that Iran's strident denial of any responsibility comes an adamant refusal to release the black box.

I imagine Sertorio will soon treat us to an article from the Saker, which will declare that passenger jets are part of the Anglo Zionist conspiracy.

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Re: An Iranian missile shot down Ukrainian jet, Trudeau says

Post by cassowary » Thu Jan 09, 2020 3:19 pm

neverfail wrote:
Thu Jan 09, 2020 12:43 pm
The airliner was a Ukranian one. Ukraine is not an enemy state of the Islamic Republic - and there were Iranian passengers on board along with the Canadian victims. If true then it was more likely the work of a jittery Iranian missile ground crew convinced that the plane was a hostile US bomber aircraft out to retaliate for the Iranian missile strike on those US bases in Iraq.

More unintended victims of Trump's deliberate stoking up of tensions between the US and Iran?

Best for the Islamic Republic to come clean on this one?

https://www.thestar.com/politics/federa ... ation.html

(P.S. What the f*** does Trudeau hope to achieve by growing a beard?)
It’s not Trump’s fault.
The Imp :D

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Sertorio
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Re: An Iranian missile shot down Ukrainian jet, Trudeau says

Post by Sertorio » Thu Jan 09, 2020 4:28 pm

Milo wrote:
Thu Jan 09, 2020 2:45 pm
I can't shed any light on the beard thing.

Interesting that Iran's strident denial of any responsibility comes an adamant refusal to release the black box.

I imagine Sertorio will soon treat us to an article from the Saker, which will declare that passenger jets are part of the Anglo Zionist conspiracy.
Passenger jets, I don't think so. But you might...You often sound sufficiently dumb to make it a real possibility... :D

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Re: An Iranian missile shot down Ukrainian jet, Trudeau says

Post by Sertorio » Thu Jan 09, 2020 5:03 pm

Milo wrote:
Thu Jan 09, 2020 2:45 pm

...I imagine Sertorio will soon treat us to an article from the Saker...
Funny you mentioned The Saker, because I have an interview made by him to Michael Hudson, "an American economist, Professor of Economics at the University of Missouri–Kansas City and a researcher at the Levy Economics Institute at Bard College, former Wall Street analyst, political consultant, commentator and journalist. He is a contributor to The Hudson Report, a weekly economic and financial news podcast produced by Left Out. Paul Craig Roberts argues that he is the best contemporary economist"...
The Saker Interviews Michael Hudson
January 9, 2020

Introduction: After posting Michael Hudson’s article “America Escalates its “Democratic” Oil War in the Near East” on the blog, I decided to ask Michael to reply to a few follow-up questions. Michael very kindly agreed. Please see our exchange below.

The Saker: Trump has been accused of not thinking forward, of not having a long-term strategy regarding the consequences of assassinating General Soleimani. Does the United States in fact have a strategy in the Near East, or is it only ad hoc?

Michael Hudson: Of course American strategists will deny that the recent actions do not reflect a deliberate strategy, because their long-term strategy is so aggressive and exploitative that it would even strike the American public as being immoral and offensive if they came right out and said it.

President Trump is just the taxicab driver, taking the passengers he has accepted – Pompeo, Bolton and the Iran-derangement syndrome neocons – wherever they tell him they want to be driven. They want to pull a heist, and he’s being used as the getaway driver (fully accepting his role). Their plan is to hold onto the main source of their international revenue: Saudi Arabia and the surrounding Near Eastern oil-export surpluses and money. They see the US losing its ability to exploit Russia and China, and look to keep Europe under its control by monopolizing key sectors so that it has the power to use sanctions to squeeze countries that resist turning over control of their economies and natural rentier monopolies to US buyers. In short, US strategists would like to do to Europe and the Near East just what they did to Russia under Yeltsin: turn over public infrastructure, natural resources and the banking system to U.S. owners, relying on US dollar credit to fund their domestic government spending and private investment.

This is basically a resource grab. Soleimani was in the same position as Chile’s Allende, Libya’s Qaddafi, Iraq’s Saddam. The motto is that of Stalin: “No person, no problem.”

The Saker: Your answer raises a question about Israel: In your recent article you only mention Israel twice, and these are only passing comments. Furthermore, you also clearly say the US Oil lobby as much more crucial than the Israel Lobby, so here is my follow-up question to you: On what basis have you come to this conclusion and how powerful do you believe the Israel Lobby to be compared to, say, the Oil lobby or the US Military-Industrial Complex? To what degree do their interests coincide and to what degree to they differ?

Michael Hudson: I wrote my article to explain the most basic concerns of U.S. international diplomacy: the balance of payments (dollarizing the global economy, basing foreign central bank savings on loans to the U.S. Treasury to finance the military spending mainly responsible for the international and domestic budget deficit), oil (and the enormous revenue produced by the international oil trade), and recruitment of foreign fighters (given the impossibility of drafting domestic U.S. soldiers in sufficient numbers). From the time these concerns became critical to today, Israel was viewed as a U.S. military base and supporter, but the U.S. policy was formulated independently of Israel.

I remember one day in 1973 or ’74 I was traveling with my Hudson Institute colleague Uzi Arad (later a head of Mossad and advisor to Netanyahu) to Asia, stopping off in San Francisco. At a quasi-party, a U.S. general came up to Uzi and clapped him on the shoulder and said, “You’re our landed aircraft carrier in the Near East,” and expressed his friendship.

Uzi was rather embarrassed. But that’s how the U.S. military thought of Israel back then. By that time the three planks of U.S. foreign policy strategy that I outlined were already firmly in place.

Of course Netanyahu has applauded U.S. moves to break up Syria, and Trump’s assassination choice. But the move is a U.S. move, and it’s the U.S. that is acting on behalf of the dollar standard, oil power and mobilizing Saudi Arabia’s Wahabi army.

Israel fits into the U.S.-structured global diplomacy much like Turkey does. They and other countries act opportunistically within the context set by U.S. diplomacy to pursue their own policies. Obviously Israel wants to secure the Golan Heights; hence its opposition to Syria, and also its fight with Lebanon; hence, its opposition to Iran as the backer of Assad and Hezbollah. This dovetails with US policy.

But when it comes to the global and U.S. domestic response, it’s the United States that is the determining active force. And its concern rests above all with protecting its cash cow of Saudi Arabia, as well as working with the Saudi jihadis to destabilize governments whose foreign policy is independent of U.S. direction – from Syria to Russia (Wahabis in Chechnya) to China (Wahabis in the western Uighur region). The Saudis provide the underpinning for U.S. dollarization (by recycling their oil revenues into U.S. financial investments and arms purchases), and also by providing and organizing the ISIS terrorists and coordinating their destruction with U.S. objectives. Both the Oil lobby and the Military-Industrial Complex obtain huge economic benefits from the Saudis.

Therefore, to focus one-sidedly on Israel is a distraction away from what the US-centered international order really is all about.

The Saker: In your recent article you wrote: “The assassination was intended to escalate America’s presence in Iraq to keep control the region’s oil reserves.” Others believe that the goal was precisely the opposite, to get a pretext to remove the US forces from both Iraq and Syria. What are your grounds to believe that your hypothesis is the most likely one?

Michael Hudson: Why would killing Soleimani help remove the U.S. presence? He was the leader of the fight against ISIS, especially in Syria. US policy was to continue using ISIS to permanently destabilize Syria and Iraq so as to prevent a Shi’ite crescent reaching from Iran to Lebanon – which incidentally would serve as part of China’s Belt and Road initiative. So it killed Soleimani to prevent the peace negotiation. He was killed because he had been invited by Iraq’s government to help mediate a rapprochement between Iran and Saudi Arabia. That was what the United States feared most of all, because it effectively would prevent its control of the region and Trump’s drive to seize Iraqi and Syrian oil.

So using the usual Orwellian doublethink, Soleimani was accused of being a terrorist, and assassinated under the U.S. 2002 military Authorization Bill giving the President to move without Congressional approval against Al Qaeda. Trump used it to protect Al Qaeda’s terrorist ISIS offshoots.

Given my three planks of U.S. diplomacy described above, the United States must remain in the Near East to hold onto Saudi Arabia and try to make Iraq and Syria client states equally subservient to U.S. balance-of-payments and oil policy.

Certainly the Saudis must realize that as the buttress of U.S. aggression and terrorism in the Near East, their country (and oil reserves) are the most obvious target to speed the parting guest. I suspect that this is why they are seeking a rapprochement with Iran. And I think it is destined to come about, at least to provide breathing room and remove the threat. The Iranian missiles to Iraq were a demonstration of how easy it would be to aim them at Saudi oil fields. What then would be Aramco’s stock market valuation?

The Saker: In your article you wrote: “The major deficit in the U.S. balance of payments has long been military spending abroad. The entire payments deficit, beginning with the Korean War in 1950-51 and extending through the Vietnam War of the 1960s, was responsible for forcing the dollar off gold in 1971. The problem facing America’s military strategists was how to continue supporting the 800 U.S. military bases around the world and allied troop support without losing America’s financial leverage.” I want to ask a basic, really primitive question in this regard: how cares about the balance of payments as long as 1) the US continues to print money 2) most of the world will still want dollars. Does that not give the US an essentially “infinite” budget? What is the flaw in this logic?

Michael Hudson: The U.S. Treasury can create dollars to spend at home, and the Fed can increase the banking system’s ability to create dollar credit and pay debts denominated in US dollars. But they cannot create foreign currency to pay other countries, unless they willingly accept dollars ad infinitum – and that entails bearing the costs of financing the U.S. balance-of-payments deficit, getting only IOUs in exchange for real resources that they sell to U.S. buyers.

This is the situation that arose half a century ago. The United States could print dollars in 1971, but it could not print gold.

In the 1920s, Germany’s Reichsbank could print deutsche marks – trillions of them. When it came to pay Germany’s foreign reparations debt, all it could do was to throw these D-marks onto the foreign exchange market. That crashed the currency’s exchange rate, forcing up the price of imports proportionally and causing the German hyperinflation.

The question is, how many surplus dollars do foreign governments want to hold. Supporting the dollar standard ends up supporting U.S. foreign diplomacy and military policy. For the first time since World War II, the most rapidly growing parts of the world are seeking to de-dollarize their economies by reducing reliance on U.S. exports, U.S. investment, and U.S. bank loans. This move is creating an alternative to the dollar, likely to replace it with groups of other currencies and assets in national financial reserves.

The Saker: In the same article you also write: “So maintaining the dollar as the world’s reserve currency became a mainstay of U.S. military spending.” We often hear people say that the dollar is about to tank and that as soon as that happens, then the US economy (and, according to some, the EU economy too) will collapse. In the intelligence community there is something called tracking the “indicators and warnings”. My question to you is: what are the economic “indicators and warnings” of a possible (probable?) collapse of the US dollar followed by a collapse of the financial markets most tied to the Dollar? What shall people like myself (I am an economic ignoramus) keep an eye on and look for?

Michael Hudson: What is most likely is a slow decline, largely from debt deflation and cutbacks in social spending, in the Eurozone and US economies. Of course, the decline will force the more highly debt-leveraged companies to miss their bond payments and drive them into insolvency. That is the fate of Thatcherized economies. But it will be long and painfully drawn out, largely because there is little left-wing socialist alternative to neoliberalism at present.

Trump’s protectionist policies and sanctions are forcing other countries to become self-reliant and independent of US suppliers, from farm crops to airplanes and military arms, against the US threat of a cutoff or sanctions against repairs, spare parts and servicing. Sanctioning Russian agriculture has helped it become a major crop exporter, and to become much more independent in vegetables, dairy and cheese products. The US has little to offer industrially, especially given the fact that its IT communications are stuffed with US spyware.

Europe therefore is facing increasing pressure from its business sector to choose the non-US economic alliance that is growing more rapidly and offers a more profitable investment market and more secure trade supplier. Countries will turn as much as possible (diplomatically as well as financially and economically) to non-US suppliers because the United States is not reliable, and because it is being shrunk by the neoliberal policies supported by Trump and the Democrats alike. A byproduct probably will be a continued move toward gold as an alternative do the dollar in settling balance-of-payments deficits.

The Saker: Finally, my last question: which country out there do you see as the most capable foe of the current US-imposed international political and economic world order? whom do you believe that US Deep State and the Neocons fear most? China? Russia? Iran? some other country? How would you compare them and on the basis of what criteria?

Michael Hudson: The leading country breaking up US hegemony obviously is the United States itself. That is Trump’s major contribution. He is uniting the world in a move toward multi-centrism much more than any ostensibly anti-American could have done. And he is doing it all in the name of American patriotism and nationalism – the ultimate Orwellian rhetorical wrapping!

Trump has driven Russia and China together with the other members of the Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO), including Iran as observer. His demand that NATO join in US oil grabs and its supportive terrorism in the Near East and military confrontation with Russia in Ukraine and elsewhere probably will lead to European “Ami go home” demonstrations against NATO and America’s threat of World War III.

No single country can counter the U.S. unipolar world order. It takes a critical mass of countries. This already is taking place among the countries that you list above. They are simply acting in their own common interest, using their own mutual currencies for trade and investment. The effect is an alternative multilateral currency and trading area.

The United States is now turning on the screws demanding that other countries sacrifice their growth in order to finance the U.S. unipolar empire. In effect, foreign countries are beginning to respond to the United States what the ten tribes of Israel said when they withdrew from the southern kingdom of Judah, whose king Rehoboam refused to lighten his demands (1 Kings 12). They echoed the cry of Sheba son of Bikri a generation earlier: “Look after your own house, O David!” The message is: What do other countries have to gain by remaining in the US unipolar neoliberalized world, as compared to using their own wealth to build up their own economies? It’s an age-old problem.

The dollar will still play a role in US trade and investment, but it will be as just another currency, held at arms length until it finally gives up its domineering attempt to strip other countries’ wealth for itself. However, its demise may not be a pretty sight.

The Saker: I thank you very much for your time and answers!

https://www.unz.com/tsaker/the-saker-in ... -hudson-2/
Being a lawyer you are used to reading long documents, so I'm sure I am not straining your attention by offering you a text which - if properly understood - may help you avoiding repeating some of your more common mistakes...

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Doc
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Re: An Iranian missile shot down Ukrainian jet, Trudeau says

Post by Doc » Thu Jan 09, 2020 6:13 pm

Sertorio wrote:
Thu Jan 09, 2020 4:28 pm
Milo wrote:
Thu Jan 09, 2020 2:45 pm
I can't shed any light on the beard thing.

Interesting that Iran's strident denial of any responsibility comes an adamant refusal to release the black box.

I imagine Sertorio will soon treat us to an article from the Saker, which will declare that passenger jets are part of the Anglo Zionist conspiracy.
Passenger jets, I don't think so. But you might...You often sound sufficiently dumb to make it a real possibility... :D
“"I fancied myself as some kind of god....It is a sort of disease when you consider yourself some kind of god, the creator of everything, but I feel comfortable about it now since I began to live it out.” -- George Soros

neverfail
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Re: An Iranian missile shot down Ukrainian jet, Trudeau says

Post by neverfail » Fri Jan 10, 2020 1:19 pm

Milo wrote:
Thu Jan 09, 2020 2:45 pm
Interesting that Iran's strident denial of any responsibility comes an adamant refusal to release the black box.
National pride seems to be at stake here.

Like Vladimir Putin with the 2014 shooting down of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 by Russian military missile technicians over the eastern Ukraine; the Iranian government is loath to admit that anyone in their military would be capable of making such a ghastly error of judgement.

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Re: An Iranian missile shot down Ukrainian jet, Trudeau says

Post by Collingwood » Fri Jan 10, 2020 1:29 pm

Ah, that's what the Cossacks get for not investigating Biden Junior when Donald asked them to.

Who says there's no justice in the world?

-- Collingwood

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Sertorio
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Re: An Iranian missile shot down Ukrainian jet, Trudeau says

Post by Sertorio » Fri Jan 10, 2020 4:02 pm

neverfail wrote:
Fri Jan 10, 2020 1:19 pm
Milo wrote:
Thu Jan 09, 2020 2:45 pm
Interesting that Iran's strident denial of any responsibility comes an adamant refusal to release the black box.
National pride seems to be at stake here.

Like Vladimir Putin with the 2014 shooting down of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 by Russian military missile technicians over the eastern Ukraine; the Iranian government is loath to admit that anyone in their military would be capable of making such a ghastly error of judgement.
Iran has allowed the Ukrainians access to the black boxes, and asked for the assistance of France in decoding them. So it seems Iran has nothing to hide.

As to Malaysia Airlines Flight 17, new evidence seems to prove Russia had nothing to do with it. But who cares? What's important is slandering Russia in every possible occasion.

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Re: An Iranian missile shot down Ukrainian jet, Trudeau says

Post by Doc » Fri Jan 10, 2020 4:09 pm

Collingwood wrote:
Fri Jan 10, 2020 1:29 pm


-- Collingwood
Most excellent
“"I fancied myself as some kind of god....It is a sort of disease when you consider yourself some kind of god, the creator of everything, but I feel comfortable about it now since I began to live it out.” -- George Soros

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