Australian Bushfires

Discussion of current events
Jim the Moron
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Re: Australian Bushfires

Post by Jim the Moron » Fri Jan 17, 2020 3:25 pm

lzzrdgrrl wrote:
Fri Jan 17, 2020 2:05 pm
Police Take Legal Action Against More Than 180 in Australia’s Most Populous State for Alleged Bushfire-Related Offenses
Since November 2019, a total of 183 people have been targeted by police in the state of New South Wales (NSW) for 205 fire-related offenses, according to the NSW Police Force.

NSW police said 24 were apprehended and charged with deliberately lighting bushfires. A further 53 people face legal action for allegedly failing to comply with a total fire ban, while 47 others are accused of improperly discarding lit cigarettes or matches outdoors.
https://www.theepochtimes.com/nearly-20 ... 95827.html

Yeah, yeah........kill a koala for climate change. See how THAT goes down with public sentiments.........
Koala mourning . . .
https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/10764264/ ... ad-friend/

neverfail
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Location: Singapore

Re: Australian Bushfires

Post by neverfail » Fri Jan 17, 2020 3:42 pm

lzzrdgrrl wrote:
Fri Jan 17, 2020 2:05 pm
Police Take Legal Action Against More Than 180 in Australia’s Most Populous State for Alleged Bushfire-Related Offenses
Since November 2019, a total of 183 people have been targeted by police in the state of New South Wales (NSW) for 205 fire-related offenses, according to the NSW Police Force.

NSW police said 24 were apprehended and charged with deliberately lighting bushfires. A further 53 people face legal action for allegedly failing to comply with a total fire ban, while 47 others are accused of improperly discarding lit cigarettes or matches outdoors.
https://www.theepochtimes.com/nearly-20 ... 95827.html

Yeah, yeah........kill a koala for climate change. See how THAT goes down with public sentiments.........
Sadly Izz this article does not tell the full story.

True, this hot dry weather along with official fire restrictions seem to bring the firebugs out of the woodwork (I would not be surprised if some start them as an "up yours" way to spite the authorities). Other fires are started inadvertently while others still have natural causes such as lightning strikes (several of our blazes have began like that). The problem is tinder box conditions caused by years of accumulation of forest litter on the ground rendered tinder dry by heat; aridity and stoked up by hot, dry winds. By contrast whenever we have periods of good rain we never get that problem.

The Aboriginals of yore whenever they migrated would carry smoldering fire-sticks from their last campfire and would deliberately set fire to the dead grass and desiccated scrub wherever they went as a form of environmental management. Start some small fires as the means of averting a conflagration later. Even the first marine explorers along our east coast such as James Cook (1770) and William Bligh (1789) witnessed columns of smoke rising from the Australian mainland and noted the observation in their diarys. But since British colonization European man has not been wise enough to continue that practice so over years the dry forest litter builds up and up to inferno grade.

Stiffer sentences are not the answer. We just have to live with the fact that our island continent has a natural fire environment and live accordingly.

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Sertorio
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Re: Australian Bushfires

Post by Sertorio » Sat Jan 18, 2020 3:13 am

neverfail wrote:
Fri Jan 17, 2020 3:42 pm
lzzrdgrrl wrote:
Fri Jan 17, 2020 2:05 pm
Police Take Legal Action Against More Than 180 in Australia’s Most Populous State for Alleged Bushfire-Related Offenses
Since November 2019, a total of 183 people have been targeted by police in the state of New South Wales (NSW) for 205 fire-related offenses, according to the NSW Police Force.

NSW police said 24 were apprehended and charged with deliberately lighting bushfires. A further 53 people face legal action for allegedly failing to comply with a total fire ban, while 47 others are accused of improperly discarding lit cigarettes or matches outdoors.
https://www.theepochtimes.com/nearly-20 ... 95827.html

Yeah, yeah........kill a koala for climate change. See how THAT goes down with public sentiments.........
Sadly Izz this article does not tell the full story.

True, this hot dry weather along with official fire restrictions seem to bring the firebugs out of the woodwork (I would not be surprised if some start them as an "up yours" way to spite the authorities). Other fires are started inadvertently while others still have natural causes such as lightning strikes (several of our blazes have began like that). The problem is tinder box conditions caused by years of accumulation of forest litter on the ground rendered tinder dry by heat; aridity and stoked up by hot, dry winds. By contrast whenever we have periods of good rain we never get that problem.

The Aboriginals of yore whenever they migrated would carry smoldering fire-sticks from their last campfire and would deliberately set fire to the dead grass and desiccated scrub wherever they went as a form of environmental management. Start some small fires as the means of averting a conflagration later. Even the first marine explorers along our east coast such as James Cook (1770) and William Bligh (1789) witnessed columns of smoke rising from the Australian mainland and noted the observation in their diarys. But since British colonization European man has not been wise enough to continue that practice so over years the dry forest litter builds up and up to inferno grade.

Stiffer sentences are not the answer. We just have to live with the fact that our island continent has a natural fire environment and live accordingly.
Arsonists have also been the main cause for fires in Portugal. Maybe one should start considering throwing them into the fires they start, so they can watch them at close range... :evil:

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cassowary
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Re: the market decides - how solar makes a difference.

Post by cassowary » Sat Jan 18, 2020 2:11 pm

neverfail wrote:
Thu Jan 16, 2020 3:31 pm
cassowary wrote:
Wed Jan 15, 2020 8:49 pm

I have solar panels too and it works the same as in Australia. We sell power to the company in the daytime and draw from them at night. I estimated that it will take me 30 years to get back my money.
Why is that Cass?

It seems very odd that it takes an average of only 4 years down here to pay off the investment in rooftop solar panels but 30 years up where you are.
Well, let me think.

Possible reasons:

1) Singapore is rainy and cloudy. Australia is dryer and desert in most parts. No clouds to block the sun.

2)our roofs are pitched roofs ie at an angle to minimise sunlight so as to keep the house cool.
So this means less energy absorption.

For tropical countries, the best type of roof to harvest sunlight is a flat roof. The roof should be at the same angle as the latitude.
The Imp :D

neverfail
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Location: Singapore

Re: the market decides - how solar makes a difference.

Post by neverfail » Sat Jan 18, 2020 4:29 pm

cassowary wrote:
Sat Jan 18, 2020 2:11 pm
neverfail wrote:
Thu Jan 16, 2020 3:31 pm
cassowary wrote:
Wed Jan 15, 2020 8:49 pm

I have solar panels too and it works the same as in Australia. We sell power to the company in the daytime and draw from them at night. I estimated that it will take me 30 years to get back my money.
Why is that Cass?

It seems very odd that it takes an average of only 4 years down here to pay off the investment in rooftop solar panels but 30 years up where you are.
Well, let me think.

Possible reasons:

1) Singapore is rainy and cloudy. Australia is dryer and desert in most parts. No clouds to block the sun.

2)our roofs are pitched roofs ie at an angle to minimise sunlight so as to keep the house cool.
So this means less energy absorption.

For tropical countries, the best type of roof to harvest sunlight is a flat roof. The roof should be at the same angle as the latitude.
All of which are very valid points Cassowary.

Where there is a lot of water vapor in the air, the suspended particles of H2O tend to diffuse the radiant power of the sun in multiple directions: thereby dissipating a lot of its energetic power. By contrast if you live in an arid climate where there is little or no water vapor in the air then the solar light and heat streams down in an unimpeded straight line.

I am wondering too just how generous the credits are by the electric power supply firm/firms in Singapore to providers of daytime rooftop solar energy like you Cass? They not be as forthcoming as they are down here.
........................................................................................................................

As an aside to this topic: I have long noticed from the televised global weather reports we get down here that in Singapore along with the rest of maritime south east Asia the temperature never seems to rise above the mid -30s Celsius. Here these days summertime temperatures especially in our outback interior rise to as high as the mid-40's Celsius and above. Recently 48.5 degrees was recorded in western Queensland. By contrast nighttime temperatures can plunge to freezing point or even slightly below. In maritime s e Asia they never seem to fall below around 18 degrees Celsius.

In both cases climate is simultaneously a blessing and a curse. It is hot and steamy up there but consistently so allowing you to acclimatize to the prevailing temperatures . It also means that you miss out on the solar electrical energy but at the same time miss out on our extremes of temperature along with our recurring bushfires.

Cheers!

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cassowary
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Re: the market decides - how solar makes a difference.

Post by cassowary » Sun Jan 19, 2020 5:38 am

neverfail wrote:
Sat Jan 18, 2020 4:29 pm
cassowary wrote:
Sat Jan 18, 2020 2:11 pm
neverfail wrote:
Thu Jan 16, 2020 3:31 pm
cassowary wrote:
Wed Jan 15, 2020 8:49 pm

I have solar panels too and it works the same as in Australia. We sell power to the company in the daytime and draw from them at night. I estimated that it will take me 30 years to get back my money.
Why is that Cass?

It seems very odd that it takes an average of only 4 years down here to pay off the investment in rooftop solar panels but 30 years up where you are.
Well, let me think.

Possible reasons:

1) Singapore is rainy and cloudy. Australia is dryer and desert in most parts. No clouds to block the sun.

2)our roofs are pitched roofs ie at an angle to minimise sunlight so as to keep the house cool.
So this means less energy absorption.

For tropical countries, the best type of roof to harvest sunlight is a flat roof. The roof should be at the same angle as the latitude.
All of which are very valid points Cassowary.

Where there is a lot of water vapor in the air, the suspended particles of H2O tend to diffuse the radiant power of the sun in multiple directions: thereby dissipating a lot of its energetic power. By contrast if you live in an arid climate where there is little or no water vapor in the air then the solar light and heat streams down in an unimpeded straight line.

I am wondering too just how generous the credits are by the electric power supply firm/firms in Singapore to providers of daytime rooftop solar energy like you Cass? They not be as forthcoming as they are down here.
........................................................................................................................

As an aside to this topic: I have long noticed from the televised global weather reports we get down here that in Singapore along with the rest of maritime south east Asia the temperature never seems to rise above the mid -30s Celsius. Here these days summertime temperatures especially in our outback interior rise to as high as the mid-40's Celsius and above. Recently 48.5 degrees was recorded in western Queensland. By contrast nighttime temperatures can plunge to freezing point or even slightly below. In maritime s e Asia they never seem to fall below around 18 degrees Celsius.

In both cases climate is simultaneously a blessing and a curse. It is hot and steamy up there but consistently so allowing you to acclimatize to the prevailing temperatures . It also means that you miss out on the solar electrical energy but at the same time miss out on our extremes of temperature along with our recurring bushfires.

Cheers!
Yes, your Guess is correct. They are not generous with what they pay us for the power we generate. They pay us less than what they charge us because they want to make a profit.
The Imp :D

neverfail
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Location: Singapore

Re: the market decides - how solar makes a difference.

Post by neverfail » Sun Jan 19, 2020 12:47 pm

cassowary wrote:
Sun Jan 19, 2020 5:38 am


Yes, your Guess is correct. They are not generous with what they pay us for the power we generate. They pay us less than what they charge us because they want to make a profit.
Thanks for the confirmation Cass.

Well, no one in private enterprise can afford to run at a loss for long. When they do they go broke.

It is like that down here too Cass. The reason though is because we have a "floating" price for electric power. The price rises during peak periods and then falls during the slack. The two daily peaks are of course the morning (around breakfast time) and evening. In the daylight hours in-between there is lesser demand so prices are lower while in the early hours of the morning they are rock bottom.

Since the period of time when the solar panels are most active falls during that post-breakfast to pre-evening period of lower demand the price the electric power companies pay householder-suppliers reflects that lower price. By contrast during the morning and evening peaks the solar cells are either less active (in summertime when the days are longer) or inert altogether (in wintertime, when the days are shorter and so nighttime darkness coincides with the two peak demand times ).

(Of course this would not count in Singapore. Being almost on the equator there would be insignificant difference between the length of the days throughout the year. Indeed, effectively no summer or winter at all.)

So Cass, do you have a floating electric power price in Singapore or a fixed price rigged against rooftop suppliers of solar electric power to the grid?

neverfail
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Location: Singapore

Re: Australian Bushfires could send te country into recession

Post by neverfail » Tue Jan 21, 2020 1:43 pm

https://www.asiatimes.com/2020/01/artic ... g-inferno/

Bushfire damage could be as high as $9 billion and trim .5% off GDP with worst of blazes still to come

(SNIP)

AMP Capital earlier forecast economic losses amounting to 0.25-1% of gross domestic product (GDP), or a range of A$3-13 billion ($2-9 billion), which could give Australia zero or even negative growth this quarter.
This is no time to be the owner of shares in any Australian insurance company. Likewise with mass cancellations it is a bad time to own (or be employed by) a business reliant on overseas tourism for its profitability.

That last opinion by AMP Capital (an insurgence business) strikes me as mildly alarmist but it could turn out to be true. Since two successive quarters of negative growth (nebulous jargon for GDP shrinkage) is the technical definition of recession this country could be in for its first ever bushfire-driven recession.

neverfail
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Location: Singapore

Re: Australian Bushfires

Post by neverfail » Mon Jan 27, 2020 6:44 pm

The future of coal has already been decided in boardrooms around the globe

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-01-28/ ... s/11903928
It won't stop the current spate of bushfires or stop them from happening in future: but it least it demonstrates that an awareness of climate change and the massive losses it has to inflict on even the largest corporations has taken place among big corporate CEO's and boards of directors.

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