What happened to Australia's climate change election?

Discussion of current events
neverfail
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Location: Singapore

Re: Something does add up after all.

Post by neverfail » Thu Jun 20, 2019 5:36 am

cassowary wrote:
Wed Jun 19, 2019 1:47 am

This article seems to be saying that green energy is still expensive relative to natural gas.

https://www.americanthinker.com/article ... evada.html.

So I don’t understand why the prospects for green energy is doing well in Australia, according to Neverfail.
(Sorry! I overlooked this post.)

There is an obvious answer to dissolve your apparent puzzlement.

Your quoted article (link above) is in an American publication discussing US conditions that do not apply to Australia. Due to the energy policy screw-up I have been at pains to describe in previous posts, natural gas and electric power alike have become (for us historically) expensive and no bargain globally as well. As there appears to be no resolution or even obvious relief in sight this has made the economics of green energy very appealing.

But it seems that in the USA they have an energy market that currently works better than ours. Fracking of hydrocarbon rich shale beds has liberated a trove of methane gas that has apparently pushed down gas (and other conventional energy) prices to US consumers and that stacks the cards against the profitability of green energy in the US at least in the near term.

Your mistake was that you apparently read the (parochial thinking) American Thinkers article as defining worldwide conditions when in fact there is no standard set of energy conditions across the earth. Local anomalous factors change the picture re. green energy versus hydrocarbons based energy considerably. :D

Mr. Perfect
Posts: 1042
Joined: Sat Jan 07, 2017 11:24 pm

Re: What happened to Australia's climate change election?

Post by Mr. Perfect » Wed Sep 18, 2019 2:07 pm

Milo wrote:
Sun Jun 02, 2019 9:48 pm

Maybe you should stop spewing and start reading.
In a study published Monday in the journal Nature Climate Change, they found that limiting carbon emissions from the plastic industry to 2015 levels requires a colossal societal undertaking involving four strategies: cutting growth in demand for plastics by half, making plastic out of plants rather than oil and gas, generating electricity with renewable energy, and increasing recycling.
https://mashable.com/article/plastic-po ... te-change/
Non sequitur. The reason your cause has made zero progress in 40 years is you can't respond to the stupidly obvious rebuttals.

So do you use a bike as your sole means of transportation.

neverfail
Posts: 4104
Joined: Sun Dec 18, 2016 3:47 am
Location: Singapore

Re: Further to Australia's climate change election?

Post by neverfail » Wed Sep 18, 2019 7:03 pm

A coal-fired nation in transition

https://www.smh.com.au/national/a-coal- ... 52rl3.html
In October the former President of Kiribati, Anote Tong, might have wondered what he had ever done to offend us. He was dining in Canberra when — according to several sources — then environment minister Melissa Price blasted him: "I know why you are here. It is for the cash."

Eloquence taking wing, she added with sarcasm, "For the Pacific it is always about the cash. I’ve got my cheque book. How much do you want?"

Anote Tong had addressed the UN Security Council, speaking on climate on behalf of his atoll nation, and been nominated for the Nobel Prize. This encounter with an Australian enchantress may make DFAT histories on our diplomatic triumphs, or be appropriated by Barry Humphries for a Les Patterson script.

No wonder President Tong went on record saying, "When it comes to dealing with climate change, China is the lesser of two evils compared to Australia." Touché.
The pacific Island atoll state of Kiribati is threatened with being drowned by rising sea water due to global warming. This is not something that they need to be advised by the environmental scientists about. Any Kiribati resident can see it happen by watching their shoreline for years. The insufferable, aggressive bad manners of our Environment Minister reflects badly on the current Australian government.


But Scott Morrison has a chance to refurbish Coalition rhetoric on climate. For that matter so has Labor, as it grapples with rejection of its climate policies at the last election.

For both sides a different language is being provided by Australian business. Boardrooms accept the urgency of climate and are opting for innovation. Professor Ross Garnaut told me he thought Australia would achieve a 45 percent cut in emissions by 2030, simply as a result of investment decisions.

Morrison might have told friends from the Pacific states they needn’t nag him about coal because there was an irreversible transition underway. He could have said the Commonwealth Bank now has as little as $10 million exposed to coal. NAB was the first retail bank in the world to say it would not fund thermal coal. None of the Australian banks was prepared to fund Adani. Rio has sold its coal mines and BHP is expected to extricate itself from thermal assets.

Taking each Pacific island leader aside, the Prime Minister could have added that no Australian corporate will be putting money into coal-fired power because over the next 30 or 40 years there will be accelerating evidence of climate shift. We signed Paris, he might have said, and it has the force of law and shapes decisions by Australian boardrooms.

For its part Labor is able to say the superannuation funds are now the third biggest owner of infrastructure in Australia. Their policy is to require an annual report on carbon reductions and emissions from assets — with chief executives being held accountable.

The plunging cost of renewables in a country that leads the world in rooftop solar is a fact of life. Labor can shift its policy focus to better transmission to distribute the low cost renewable power and new batteries to store it for peak demand.
Scott Morrison did not utter a word about this transition taking place to any of the South Pacific Island leaders present at the Tuvalu conference. it moves me to wonder what kind of a team of dickheads are currently leading my country.

Our government's arrogance is only exceeded by its profound ignorance.

As for our party in Opposition; its sin is one of omission.

(Excuse me readers if I sound pissed off with Australian politics. I am!)

Mr. Perfect
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Re: What happened to Australia's climate change election?

Post by Mr. Perfect » Wed Sep 18, 2019 7:35 pm

Lol. As if Australia had any impact on sea levels.

Tell me, how do you get back and forth to work.

neverfail
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Location: Singapore

Re: What happened to Australia's climate change election?

Post by neverfail » Thu Sep 19, 2019 2:48 am

Mr. Perfect wrote:
Wed Sep 18, 2019 7:35 pm

Tell me, how do you get back and forth to work.
On a unicycle - balanced on my head. :D

Mr. Perfect
Posts: 1042
Joined: Sat Jan 07, 2017 11:24 pm

Re: What happened to Australia's climate change election?

Post by Mr. Perfect » Thu Sep 19, 2019 10:37 am

Something tells me that you drive a car. And that you emit carbon like everyone else.

Why is that.

neverfail
Posts: 4104
Joined: Sun Dec 18, 2016 3:47 am
Location: Singapore

Re: What happened to Australia's climate change election?

Post by neverfail » Fri Sep 20, 2019 12:00 am

Mr. Perfect wrote:
Thu Sep 19, 2019 10:37 am
Something tells me that you drive a car. And that you emit carbon like everyone else.

Why is that.
Get to the point!

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