Jair Bolsonaro declared Brazil's next president

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neverfail
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Re: Jair Bolsonaro declared Brazil's next president

Post by neverfail » Mon Nov 05, 2018 4:04 pm

cassowary wrote:
Mon Nov 05, 2018 3:41 am

Capitalism is not the cause of poverty. It is the antidote to poverty. It brings prosperity.
Left unmanaged by a higher authority, capitalism is both predatory and ultimately self destructive.

Tom ensure that as few as possible miss out on the benefits of market forces driven growth; I would humbly submit that good government in the needed antidote cassowary.

There is not nearly enough good government in this world. Therein lies the rub.

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cassowary
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Re: Jair Bolsonaro declared Brazil's next president

Post by cassowary » Mon Nov 05, 2018 5:28 pm

Good government can only come from a good people, Neverfail. You get the government you deserve. If people are dishonest, you will get dishonest officials in government.

In the case of Brazil, I am heartened by this article:

Brazil Is Moving Its Embassy to Jerusalem

Since it is behind a pay wall, ...
Shortly after Jair Bolsonaro’s decisive victory in the Brazilian presidential election last week, the populist leader said he would follow through on his campaign promise to move Brazil’s embassy in Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem.

Like Donald Trump, Mr. Bolsonaro—himself a Catholic but married to an evangelical Protestant pastor—owes his political success in large part to support from evangelical voters. As recently as the 1970s, Brazil was almost uniformly Catholic. But in one of the greatest religious shifts of modern times, the largest country in Latin America is today nearly as evangelical as the U.S.: 25% of Brazilians identify as evangelical Christians, compared with 26% of Americans, according to the Joshua Project. As in the U.S., many evangelical and Pentecostal Christians instinctively support Israel and endorse a law-and-order agenda at home.

At a time of increased anxiety for many Jews in Europe and North America, the rise of evangelical and Pentecostal Christian support for Judaism and Israel in much of the world is a heartening sign. Based on a literal approach to the Bible and a covenantal theology that attributes a continuing religious significance to the Jewish people and their state, these two rapidly spreading forms of Protestant Christianity tend to promote a climate of respect for individual Jews as well as support for Zionism. They view the continued existence of the Jewish people as a mark of God’s faithfulness and believe the Jewish people have a special place in God’s plan as recipients of his favor.

Improved relations with Israel are a hallmark of evangelical political influence. Guatemala, another historically Catholic country, is now about 40% Protestant. It opened an embassy in Jerusalem two days after the U.S. did. Although Latin American countries have typically been hostile to Israel since the 1967 war, that’s changing rapidly.

Benjamin Netanyahu was the first Israeli prime minister to visit Latin America when in 2017 he traveled to Argentina, Mexico and Colombia (which has a significant evangelical minority). Now Mr. Netanyahu is expected to travel to Brazil for Mr. Bolsonaro’s swearing-in. In addition to improved trade and diplomatic ties, he hopes evangelical-driven pro-Israel sentiment across the global South can reduce Israel’s isolation at the United Nations.

The rising political power of evangelical Christians has other observers on edge. Gays and lesbians fear evangelical social conservatism. Liberals worry that evangelicals prefer strong leaders who will challenge democratic norms. These concerns are real: Mr. Bolsonaro’s history of comments in favor of military dictatorship, torture and shoot-on-sight policing are profoundly unsettling. But his supporters are less worried about his potential excesses than about what feels like the catastrophic failure of the Brazilian state.

Brazil is in the grip of two crime waves. Virtually the entire political establishment has been implicated in Operation Car Wash, a multibillion-dollar bribery and money-laundering scandal centered on the state-owned oil company, and Odebrecht, a major Brazilian multinational. Meanwhile, violent gangs rule the slums in Rio de Janeiro and other Brazilian cities. State services are also failing: Brazilians who depend on government health care, transportation, education and sanitation must endure corruption and resource shortages.

For many Brazilians, things also look ominous beyond their borders: El Salvador and Honduras endure runaway gang violence; Venezuela is a failed socialist dictatorship; and Colombia has been embroiled in civil war for decades. With both Brazil’s conventional right and left deeply tainted by corruption, many Brazilians no longer trust politicians. They sense a crisis of conscience and competence that threatens their social order—and hope a radical outsider can stave off chaos.

The Bolsonaro government is likely to overstep when it comes to the use of force and to fall short of solving the massive crisis of governance now shaking Brazil and the hemisphere. But this is only to be expected. What is needed in Brazil today is not so much policy changes as a moral awakening. Brazil needs more hardworking teachers and honest school principals, dedicated municipal workers, crusading public-health officials, and incorruptible judges. In short, it needs the kind of culture of personal responsibility and social reform that Protestant piety unleashed in 19th-century Britain.


The test for the world’s surging evangelical and Pentecostal movements is not whether, in the short term, the faithful back political candidates committed to liberal norms, but whether their moral influence can build a new kind of society over time. Without moral reform, no government will provide the stability and security that the people of Brazil and so many other countries across the global South are demanding.
The change in faith towards a stricter Calvinistic form of Christianity that Evangelicals descend from will boost the Brazillian economy.

Remember what one of our Founders said? I linked to Dr Goh Keng Swee's speech before. He was asked how best to develop a poor Third World country. He answered we need to change the behaviour of the people by converting them to a narrow-minded, strict form of Protestant faith. Looks like that is what is happening in Brazil and many South American countries.

Let's see if he is right.

Mr. Perfect
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Re: Jair Bolsonaro declared Brazil's next president

Post by Mr. Perfect » Mon Nov 05, 2018 8:51 pm

neverfail wrote:
Mon Nov 05, 2018 4:04 pm
Left unmanaged by a higher authority, capitalism is both predatory and ultimately self destructive.
No.
Tom ensure that as few as possible miss out on the benefits of market forces driven growth; I would humbly submit that good government in the needed antidote cassowary.

There is not nearly enough good government in this world. Therein lies the rub.
Exactly why we don't want socialism. It requires even more government.

You are becoming a Republican.

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SteveFoerster
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Re: Jair Bolsonaro declared Brazil's next president

Post by SteveFoerster » Mon Nov 05, 2018 10:59 pm

neverfail wrote:
Mon Nov 05, 2018 4:04 pm
cassowary wrote:
Mon Nov 05, 2018 3:41 am

Capitalism is not the cause of poverty. It is the antidote to poverty. It brings prosperity.
Left unmanaged by a higher authority, capitalism is both predatory and ultimately self destructive.
The predatory and destructive aspects you see are made possible by the state, not by the marketplace.

Image
neverfail wrote:
Mon Nov 05, 2018 4:04 pm
Tom ensure that as few as possible miss out on the benefits of market forces driven growth; I would humbly submit that good government in the needed antidote cassowary.

There is not nearly enough good government in this world. Therein lies the rub.
And there's a whole branch of economics called "public choice" which explains why you'll never get it.
Writer, technologist, educator, gadfly.
President of New World University: http://newworld.ac

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Sertorio
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Re: Jair Bolsonaro declared Brazil's next president

Post by Sertorio » Tue Nov 06, 2018 3:25 am

Socialism will only work well when the human species evolves towards a more solidary posture. Until then all we can do is making society a bit less brutal and make life more bearable for the overwhelming majority.

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cassowary
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Re: Jair Bolsonaro declared Brazil's next president

Post by cassowary » Tue Nov 06, 2018 5:06 am

Sertorio wrote:
Tue Nov 06, 2018 3:25 am
Socialism will only work well when the human species evolves towards a more solidary posture. Until then all we can do is making society a bit less brutal and make life more bearable for the overwhelming majority.
For people in First World countries, life is already bearable. You don’t know what life is like in poor countries and how lucky you are.

In fact, life is also bearable in poor countries. It all depends on your attitude. Bhutan is dirt poor and people have to struggle. Yet they are believed to be the happiest country in the world. https://www.oneworldeducation.org/bhuta ... st-country

Jim the Moron
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Re: Jair Bolsonaro declared Brazil's next president

Post by Jim the Moron » Tue Nov 06, 2018 5:35 am

cassowary wrote:
Tue Nov 06, 2018 5:06 am
Sertorio wrote:
Tue Nov 06, 2018 3:25 am
Socialism will only work well when the human species evolves towards a more solidary posture. Until then all we can do is making society a bit less brutal and make life more bearable for the overwhelming majority.
For people in First World countries, life is already bearable. You don’t know what life is like in poor countries and how lucky you are.

In fact, life is also bearable in poor countries. It all depends on your attitude. Bhutan is dirt poor and people have to struggle. Yet they are believed to be the happiest country in the world. https://www.oneworldeducation.org/bhuta ... st-country
Nice - thanks much Cass.

From the link - "Bhutan is the last standing Buddhist kingdom in the world." Thailand purports to be a Buddhist kingdom. However, there there is none of the gentle Buddhism that is a feature of the accomplished royal family of Bhutan. Rather, there is the inbred ignorant Thai royal family sucking the life-blood out of the country, with the willing assistance of the corrupt military junta and the wealthy elite there.

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Sertorio
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Re: Jair Bolsonaro declared Brazil's next president

Post by Sertorio » Tue Nov 06, 2018 6:34 am

cassowary wrote:
Tue Nov 06, 2018 5:06 am

For people in First World countries, life is already bearable. You don’t know what life is like in poor countries and how lucky you are.
I lived several years in Angola, Brazil and the Ivory Coast. I know very well what life is in poor countries, and how exploited poor people are in those countries.

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Doc
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Re: Jair Bolsonaro declared Brazil's next president

Post by Doc » Tue Nov 06, 2018 9:07 am

Sertorio wrote:
Tue Nov 06, 2018 6:34 am
cassowary wrote:
Tue Nov 06, 2018 5:06 am

For people in First World countries, life is already bearable. You don’t know what life is like in poor countries and how lucky you are.
I lived several years in Angola, Brazil and the Ivory Coast. I know very well what life is in poor countries, and how exploited poor people are in those countries.
I have spent time in third world countries as well. I understand where you are coming from though I am not sure "exploited" is the right word to describe it. It seems more like "We don't need you so go away someplace and die. The Answer is "America First" or more precisely "____fill in the Blank___ First." IE countries need to take care of their own people first.
“"I fancied myself as some kind of god....It is a sort of disease when you consider yourself some kind of god, the creator of everything, but I feel comfortable about it now since I began to live it out.” -- George Soros

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cassowary
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Re: Jair Bolsonaro declared Brazil's next president

Post by cassowary » Tue Nov 06, 2018 3:42 pm

Sertorio wrote:
Tue Nov 06, 2018 6:34 am
cassowary wrote:
Tue Nov 06, 2018 5:06 am

For people in First World countries, life is already bearable. You don’t know what life is like in poor countries and how lucky you are.
I lived several years in Angola, Brazil and the Ivory Coast. I know very well what life is in poor countries, and how exploited poor people are in those countries.
Who was exploiting the poor people in Angola? The Portuguese? I recall you were an officer in the army at the time when the Angolans were fighting for independence.

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