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Re: Ice Age.

Posted: Wed Jun 14, 2017 3:27 am
by neverfail
Doc wrote:
Tue Jun 13, 2017 8:08 pm
neverfail wrote:
Tue Jun 13, 2017 5:38 pm
Doc wrote:
Tue Jun 13, 2017 6:38 am

The Earth's BIGGEST ice Age (note the singular) nearly ended life on the Earth.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Huronian_glaciation
Very well Doc. But you realise this earlier Ice Age that occurred at the birth of terrestrial life is outside the terms of reference with which I began this discussion, don't you?
My point is it is in the winds and the currents as much as anything.
(quote from your provided link above): Before the Huronian Ice Age, most organisms were anaerobic, but around this time, the cyanobacteria evolved photosynthesis. These bacteria were able to reproduce at exponential rates due to their new ecological niche, exploiting the near-limitless energy of the sunlight. Their photosynthesis produced oxygen as a waste product expelled into the air. At first, most of this oxygen was absorbed through the oxidization of surface iron and the decomposition of life forms. However, as the population of the cyanobacteria continued to grow, these oxygen sinks became saturated.[3] This led to a mass extinction of most life forms, which were anaerobic, as oxygen was toxic to them. As oxygen "polluted" the mostly methane atmosphere, and methane bonded with oxygen to form carbon dioxide and water, a different, thinner atmosphere emerged, and Earth began to lose heat. Thus began the Huronian Ice Age.

No mention of winds and currents as the cause of this earliest ice age Doc. I concede though that winds and currents did likiely play an auxiliary role in perpetuating the more recent serial ice ages.

Re: Antarctica: an Ice Age without end?

Posted: Wed Jun 14, 2017 3:52 am
by neverfail
https://www.google.com.au/search?q=when ... e&ie=UTF-8

How much ice is in the Antarctic?
The Antarctic ice sheet is the largest single mass of ice on Earth. It covers an area of almost 14 million square km and contains 30 million cubic km of ice. Around 90 percent of the fresh water on the Earth's surface is held in the ice sheet, an amount equivalent to 70 m of water in the world's oceans.


Lord help us all should global warming cause it to melt.

How was the Antarctic formed?
It is believed that the reduction in Earth's carbon dioxide levels, as well as changes in its orbit, caused a high degree of cooling. This, in combination with the formation of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, formed glaciers on the landmass, which grew sizably and carved deep valleys in the landscape.


Warm water from the tropics never reaches this icy continent. Unlike the Arctic Sea which gets the residue of warmth from the North Atlantic Drift.

Re: Ice Age.

Posted: Wed Jun 14, 2017 7:12 am
by Doc
neverfail wrote:
Wed Jun 14, 2017 3:27 am
Doc wrote:
Tue Jun 13, 2017 8:08 pm
neverfail wrote:
Tue Jun 13, 2017 5:38 pm
Doc wrote:
Tue Jun 13, 2017 6:38 am

The Earth's BIGGEST ice Age (note the singular) nearly ended life on the Earth.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Huronian_glaciation
Very well Doc. But you realise this earlier Ice Age that occurred at the birth of terrestrial life is outside the terms of reference with which I began this discussion, don't you?
My point is it is in the winds and the currents as much as anything.
(quote from your provided link above): Before the Huronian Ice Age, most organisms were anaerobic, but around this time, the cyanobacteria evolved photosynthesis. These bacteria were able to reproduce at exponential rates due to their new ecological niche, exploiting the near-limitless energy of the sunlight. Their photosynthesis produced oxygen as a waste product expelled into the air. At first, most of this oxygen was absorbed through the oxidization of surface iron and the decomposition of life forms. However, as the population of the cyanobacteria continued to grow, these oxygen sinks became saturated.[3] This led to a mass extinction of most life forms, which were anaerobic, as oxygen was toxic to them. As oxygen "polluted" the mostly methane atmosphere, and methane bonded with oxygen to form carbon dioxide and water, a different, thinner atmosphere emerged, and Earth began to lose heat. Thus began the Huronian Ice Age.

No mention of winds and currents as the cause of this earliest ice age Doc. I concede though that winds and currents did likiely play an auxiliary role in perpetuating the more recent serial ice ages.
"as much as anything."
The distribution of heat and cold is what drives the weather to equalize the temperature. Preventing that from happening can cause large areas to be covered with snow which reflects heat back into space.

Re: Ice Age.

Posted: Thu Jun 15, 2017 12:58 am
by neverfail
Doc wrote:
Tue Jun 13, 2017 8:08 pm


The distribution of heat and cold is what drives the weather to equalize the temperature. Preventing that from happening can cause large areas to be covered with snow which reflects heat back into space.
Agreed! But something has to cause it to become permanent in the first place.

After all, annually most of North America and northern Eurasia alike get covered for months on end with snowfall, yet the resultant reflection of heat back into space has been insufficient to bring on a new ice age.

Re: Ice Age.

Posted: Thu Jun 15, 2017 2:49 am
by Doc
neverfail wrote:
Thu Jun 15, 2017 12:58 am
Doc wrote:
Tue Jun 13, 2017 8:08 pm


The distribution of heat and cold is what drives the weather to equalize the temperature. Preventing that from happening can cause large areas to be covered with snow which reflects heat back into space.
Agreed! But something has to cause it to become permanent in the first place.

After all, annually most of North America and northern Eurasia alike get covered for months on end with snowfall, yet the resultant reflection of heat back into space has been insufficient to bring on a new ice age.
I think it is at the point that snow is on the ground all year down to the lower to upper lower parts of Canada and Asia that is when the ICE kicks in. BTW DId you know that hotter weather shifts the rain belts further north and precipitation is more likely to fall as snow?

Re: Ice Age.

Posted: Thu Jun 15, 2017 7:23 am
by neverfail
Doc wrote:
Thu Jun 15, 2017 2:49 am


I think it is at the point that snow is on the ground all year down to the lower to upper lower parts of Canada and Asia that is when the ICE kicks in. BTW DId you know that hotter weather shifts the rain belts further north and precipitation is more likely to fall as snow?
But if the polar regions are getting warmer too, does that not mean that the rain is more likely to fall as rain instead of snow even in those parts?

Re: Ice Age.

Posted: Thu Jun 15, 2017 10:57 am
by Doc
neverfail wrote:
Thu Jun 15, 2017 7:23 am
Doc wrote:
Thu Jun 15, 2017 2:49 am


I think it is at the point that snow is on the ground all year down to the lower to upper lower parts of Canada and Asia that is when the ICE kicks in. BTW DId you know that hotter weather shifts the rain belts further north and precipitation is more likely to fall as snow?
But if the polar regions are getting warmer too, does that not mean that the rain is more likely to fall as rain instead of snow even in those parts?
I am getting this from my College Geo Prof. The rain belts shifting is not a 1:1 relation to how much more northern temps rise. Plus if you get a mix of first heavy snow cover then rain then freezing conditions, the resulting ice tends to stick around much longer than just snow would

Re: Ice Age.

Posted: Tue Jun 20, 2017 4:32 am
by neverfail
Doc wrote:
Thu Jun 15, 2017 10:57 am


I am getting this from my College Geo Prof. The rain belts shifting is not a 1:1 relation to how much more northern temps rise. Plus if you get a mix of first heavy snow cover then rain then freezing conditions, the resulting ice tends to stick around much longer than just snow would
I can see your (and his?) point doc. Do you view global warming as contributing to the northern drift of the rains?

Re: Ice Age.

Posted: Tue Jun 20, 2017 2:43 pm
by Doc
neverfail wrote:
Tue Jun 20, 2017 4:32 am
Doc wrote:
Thu Jun 15, 2017 10:57 am


I am getting this from my College Geo Prof. The rain belts shifting is not a 1:1 relation to how much more northern temps rise. Plus if you get a mix of first heavy snow cover then rain then freezing conditions, the resulting ice tends to stick around much longer than just snow would
I can see your (and his?) point doc. Do you view global warming as contributing to the northern drift of the rains?
Global Warming and cooling have an effect on drift north or south on the rain belts. BTW another thought - Cloudy skies block sunlight. Meaning less snow melt.