Music

High Culture, Religion, Philosophy and Esoterica.
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Apollonius
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Re: Music

Post by Apollonius » Fri Feb 10, 2017 8:21 am


Los elementos (selections)
- Antonio Literes (1670-1745) ; Lidia Vinyes Curtis, Maria Hinojosa, Donato di Gioia, Marina Pardo ; Le Tendre Amour

Cyclamen persicum
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Re: Music

Post by Cyclamen persicum » Fri Feb 10, 2017 9:49 am




Shams Ensemble And Ukrainian Philharmonic Orchestra







All RUMI lyrics


.

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Booklady
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Re: Music

Post by Booklady » Sun Mar 12, 2017 2:37 pm



Maria Callas singing O Mio Bambino Caro in her farewell performance

Maria Callas 'London Farewell Concert' 1973, part V of V
A saucer of cream will do for me, thank you for your kindness.

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Apollonius
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Re: Music

Post by Apollonius » Thu Mar 16, 2017 8:31 am

Aux longueurs d'Apollon (from Platée) - Jean Philippe Rameau (1683-1764) ; Mireille Delunsch, soprano ; Orchestra and Chorus of Les Musiciens du Louvre - Grenoble directed by Marc Minkowski

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Apollonius
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Re: Music

Post by Apollonius » Thu Mar 16, 2017 8:33 am

Vo solcando un mar (from Artaserse) - Leonardo Vinci (1690-1730) ; Franco Fagioli, countertenor ; Concerto Köln directed by Diego Fasolis

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Apollonius
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Re: Music

Post by Apollonius » Thu Mar 16, 2017 8:34 am


Tempesta di mare
- Simone Kermes, soprano ; Venice Baroque Orchestra directed by Luca Mares

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Apollonius
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Re: Music

Post by Apollonius » Thu Mar 16, 2017 8:36 am

Philippe Jaroussky à la Galerie des Glaces (with l'Ensemble Artaserse)

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Apollonius
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Re: Music

Post by Apollonius » Thu Mar 16, 2017 8:39 am


Il diluvio universale
- Michelangelo Falvetti (1642-1692) ; various soloists ; Chœur de chambre de Namur ; La Cappella Mediterranea directed by Leonardo García Alarcón

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lzzrdgrrl
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Re: Music

Post by lzzrdgrrl » Thu Mar 16, 2017 9:25 am

A supple baritone bass...... His rolled trills makes me embarrassed for my semi-paralysed mid western palate. The first one is just playing around, the second is serious business......'>.......



Let's try this modelling exercise. Let's envision a world in a parallel universe somewhere let's say, where I'm right.........

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Apollonius
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Re: Music

Post by Apollonius » Tue Mar 28, 2017 11:08 am

I've quoted Heather Mac Donald in a completely different context. This review of Rusalka shows that in addition to savvy reporting on contemporary American social problems, she is also a formidable music critic.


Dvořák is not among my favourite composers (in fact, I listen to very little modern opera, i.e., opera composed after 1800), but there are comments here which apply to most contemporary opera production.



Magisterial, when not maddening
- Heather Mac Donald, City Journal, 17 March 2017
https://www.city-journal.org/html/magis ... 15062.html


The review concludes:

Despite the production’s missteps, Met audiences dodged a bullet. The directorial abominations that have been urged on the Met make the Zimmerman misfirings tolerable. So how did the New York press respond? Predictably—and dangerously. If a critic liked the production, it was for the wrong reasons. If he panned it, it was also for the wrong reasons. The New York Times’s senior classical music critic, the estimable Anthony Tommasini, enthused over Zimmerman’s “dark vision of the patriarchal oppression at the root of the fairy tale.” Tommasini’s evidence for this “patriarchal oppression” was the fact that the Prince wrapped Rusalka in his cloak at the end of their first encounter and then lifted her in his arms. In Tommasini’s eyes, Rusalka is being forced to “submit” to the Prince’s “strictures.” If this innocent act of chivalry constitutes oppression, then romance is truly dead. Nevertheless, the message has been sent: “shockingly dark,” as Tommasini termed Zimmerman’s reading, equals “good!”

Tommasini’s reflexive invocation of “patriarchy” is particularly inapt here. Rusalka eludes all human bonds, negative or positive. It is she who kills the Prince with her kiss, becoming more like the archetypal mermaid who lures men to their watery graves. This is not patriarchy; it is siren-archy.

The New York Observer's James Jorden, by contrast, was withering. He again invoked the sick Kusej staging of paternal rape as the litmus test, against which Zimmerman failed miserably. (Opolais sang the lead in that production as well.) Zimmerman had “no grasp” of the “darker elements” that inspired the Kusej sex-abuse concept, Jorden griped. He mocked Jezibaba’s “cutesy half-animal creatures.” And he saw cheap “sentimentality” in the final scene, which he misremembers. Message to the Met: anything short of the utter desecration of innocence and beauty will be scorned as timid and retrograde. Get with the program!

It would be unrealistic to hope that Peter Gelb, or any other arts administrator or board, would be wholly unmoved by such critical pressures. The press drumbeat for adolescent revisionism cannot help but have some effect on managerial decision-making. So far, to Gelb’s credit, the Met remains far less infected by Regietheater than any other major Western opera house. But the most radical thing that Gelb could do would be to honor consistently the lost conventions of the artistic past. We pay down our debt to geniuses like Dvořák by seeking to realize their intentions as faithfully as possible. Doing so also creates real “difference” and “diversity,” by expanding our experience of what it is to be human.


(Postscript: Moravian director Peter Weigl’s 1977 movie version of Rusalka would give critics like Jorden and Wolfe a heart attack. The 1970’s glamour aesthetic is amusing, but the film offers a powerfully dynamic reading of the score, under the baton of Libor Pesek; the nymph choruses have the fierce quality of Bacchantes, thanks to an uninhibited use of the triangle. The Czechoslovakian singers, led by Gabriela Beňačková and Peter Dvorský, are excellent, and it is a pleasure to hear the language idiomatically pronounced. The majestic palace scenes were shot at the Schloss Nymphenburg and the Herrenchiemsee in Bavaria. Sadly, about 30 minutes of music have been cut—most devastatingly, Rusalka’s aria that opens Act III, “Necitelná vodní moci” (Unfeeling watery power), which contains some unbearably bittersweet instrumental writing, best heard in the Charles MacKerras-Fleming CD. The film is lip-synched and there are no subtitles, but the libretto can be found online.)

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