Singapore establishment feels threatened by the exercise of democratic rights.

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neverfail
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Singapore establishment feels threatened by the exercise of democratic rights.

Post by neverfail » Mon Dec 04, 2017 12:27 am

XXX.XXX.XXX.XX

"PM Lee Hsien Loong's authoritarian regime is reimposing a climate of fear similar to his father's after a brief dalliance with more openness".

All right! So what are they so scared of up there in south east Asia's gilded police state?

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cassowary
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Re: Singapore establishment feels threatened by the exercise of democratic rights.

Post by cassowary » Mon Dec 04, 2017 2:48 am

neverfail wrote:
Mon Dec 04, 2017 12:27 am
lydia.readwin@cruise1st.com.au

"PM Lee Hsien Loong's authoritarian regime is reimposing a climate of fear similar to his father's after a brief dalliance with more openness".

All right! So what are they so scared of up there in south east Asia's gilded police state?
Neverfail,

You have given us someone's email address.

neverfail
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Re: Singapore establishment feels threatened by the exercise of democratic rights.

Post by neverfail » Mon Dec 04, 2017 4:25 am

cassowary wrote:
Mon Dec 04, 2017 2:48 am
neverfail wrote:
Mon Dec 04, 2017 12:27 am
lydia.readwin@cruise1st.com.au

"PM Lee Hsien Loong's authoritarian regime is reimposing a climate of fear similar to his father's after a brief dalliance with more openness".

All right! So what are they so scared of up there in south east Asia's gilded police state?
Neverfail,

You have given us someone's email address.
Sorry, but that was what my screen gave me with the Asia Times article cass. Now they have since changed it to this:

http://www.atimes.com/article/no-dissid ... singapore/

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cassowary
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Re: Singapore establishment feels threatened by the exercise of democratic rights.

Post by cassowary » Mon Dec 04, 2017 7:37 am

In the case of Amos Yee, he is a trouble-maker and most Singaporeans detest him. His offense was to insult Christians and Muslims.

Here is a sample of Amos Yee's Utube offerings:



The government is not worried about Christian reaction to his rantings. But they are scared of what Muslims can do. Don't forget Singapore is surrounded by them. For the sake of peace and prosperity, the government has to clamp down on free speech when it comes to religion and race. Most Singaporeans are OK with that.Amos Yee also offended the vast majority of Singaporeans who were in deep mourning after LKY's death. Amos posted a picture of LKY having sex with Margaret Thatcher on his Facebook.

In the case of Yan Jun, he could have carried out his demonstrations in Speaker's Corner where it is legal. But the attention seeker had to do it in front of the British and US embassies. Of course, few would have paid attention to him at Speakers' Corner. Getting himself arrested wil get him attention like it did Amos Yee.

Speakers' Corner can be a lively place at times at times:

Image

Here demonstrators protest against influx of foreign workers taking away our jobs.

Image

Here is another one protesting the election of Halimah Yacob as President.

I don't think it is fair to say Singapore is authoritarian. You can protest but the government detests disorderliness. So protests are limited to one location. Spontaneous demonstrations breaking out anywhere can get out of control. We don't want riots. People get hurt and property gets damaged. You have to inform the police that you want to hold a demonstration at Speakers' Corner so that they can take precautions against violence. That is the Singapore way.

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Milo
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Re: Singapore establishment feels threatened by the exercise of democratic rights.

Post by Milo » Mon Dec 04, 2017 9:10 am

cassowary wrote:
Mon Dec 04, 2017 7:37 am
In the case of Amos Yee, he is a trouble-maker and most Singaporeans detest him. His offense was to insult Christians and Muslims.

Here is a sample of Amos Yee's Utube offerings:



The government is not worried about Christian reaction to his rantings. But they are scared of what Muslims can do. Don't forget Singapore is surrounded by them. For the sake of peace and prosperity, the government has to clamp down on free speech when it comes to religion and race. Most Singaporeans are OK with that.Amos Yee also offended the vast majority of Singaporeans who were in deep mourning after LKY's death. Amos posted a picture of LKY having sex with Margaret Thatcher on his Facebook.

In the case of Yan Jun, he could have carried out his demonstrations in Speaker's Corner where it is legal. But the attention seeker had to do it in front of the British and US embassies. Of course, few would have paid attention to him at Speakers' Corner. Getting himself arrested wil get him attention like it did Amos Yee.

Speakers' Corner can be a lively place at times at times:

Image

Here demonstrators protest against influx of foreign workers taking away our jobs.

Image

Here is another one protesting the election of Halimah Yacob as President.

I don't think it is fair to say Singapore is authoritarian. You can protest but the government detests disorderliness. So protests are limited to one location. Spontaneous demonstrations breaking out anywhere can get out of control. We don't want riots. People get hurt and property gets damaged. You have to inform the police that you want to hold a demonstration at Speakers' Corner so that they can take precautions against violence. That is the Singapore way.
And paying the jizyah is cheaper than security?

neverfail
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Re: Singapore establishment feels threatened by the exercise of democratic rights.

Post by neverfail » Mon Dec 04, 2017 2:06 pm

cassowary wrote:
Mon Dec 04, 2017 7:37 am
In the case of Amos Yee, he is a trouble-maker and most Singaporeans detest him. His offense was to insult Christians and Muslims.

Here is a sample of Amos Yee's Utube offerings:


Thanks cass. You might have guessed that I posted this link to a recent Asia Times article to sound out your opinion. I have no set one of my own. You put up a good case with reference to Singapore's fragile security situation.

But cass, the article mentions a number of other dissidents whose activism seems to have more legitimacy (as distinct from legal sanction) than blogger Yee's; yet you mention only this soft target blowhard as though his case is supposed to bring disrepute down on all of the others:

(quote) That doesn’t sound so illiberal in theory until recalling that the government characterized teen blogger Amos Yee’s YouTube harmless rants as hate speech, suggesting that the state’s tolerance threshold is low. (Yee was recently granted political asylum in America.) (unquote)

Two points: it is your government that decides what is "hate speech" and what is otherwise just harmless sounding off. There is a danger here that the top honchos in the ruling party routinely abuse these sweeping powers to stamp out any sign of discontent before it can coalesce into an opposition movement that endangers it's monopoly grip on power - on the pretext of national security and social harmony. Are you not concerned about this and if not why not?

(Yee was recently granted political asylum in America.) really? I doubt whether the US authorities would have done that lightly.

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Milo
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Re: Singapore establishment feels threatened by the exercise of democratic rights.

Post by Milo » Mon Dec 04, 2017 11:18 pm

neverfail wrote:
Mon Dec 04, 2017 2:06 pm
cassowary wrote:
Mon Dec 04, 2017 7:37 am
In the case of Amos Yee, he is a trouble-maker and most Singaporeans detest him. His offense was to insult Christians and Muslims.

Here is a sample of Amos Yee's Utube offerings:


Thanks cass. You might have guessed that I posted this link to a recent Asia Times article to sound out your opinion. I have no set one of my own. You put up a good case with reference to Singapore's fragile security situation.

But cass, the article mentions a number of other dissidents whose activism seems to have more legitimacy (as distinct from legal sanction) than blogger Yee's; yet you mention only this soft target blowhard as though his case is supposed to bring disrepute down on all of the others:

(quote) That doesn’t sound so illiberal in theory until recalling that the government characterized teen blogger Amos Yee’s YouTube harmless rants as hate speech, suggesting that the state’s tolerance threshold is low. (Yee was recently granted political asylum in America.) (unquote)

Two points: it is your government that decides what is "hate speech" and what is otherwise just harmless sounding off. There is a danger here that the top honchos in the ruling party routinely abuse these sweeping powers to stamp out any sign of discontent before it can coalesce into an opposition movement that endangers it's monopoly grip on power - on the pretext of national security and social harmony. Are you not concerned about this and if not why not?

(Yee was recently granted political asylum in America.) really? I doubt whether the US authorities would have done that lightly.
Indeed this guy is like some sort of provocateur.

On another thread I highlighted the trials of a Lee scion who is a Harvard Fellow, charged by the Singapore Attorney General with putting a rather innocuous post on Facebook!

neverfail
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Re: Singapore establishment feels threatened by the exercise of democratic rights.

Post by neverfail » Tue Dec 05, 2017 1:54 am

Milo wrote:
Mon Dec 04, 2017 11:18 pm


Indeed this guy is like some sort of provocateur.


Now that I have overcome the computer glitch that formerly preventing me from listening to the soundtrack, yes, I can now see what cassowary means. This guy is no harmless prankster - his language is aggressively obscene. You do not even need to be a Muslim to feel offended.

Did the US actually give this turkey political asylum? On what grounds?

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Milo
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Re: Singapore establishment feels threatened by the exercise of democratic rights.

Post by Milo » Tue Dec 05, 2017 10:02 am

neverfail wrote:
Tue Dec 05, 2017 1:54 am
Milo wrote:
Mon Dec 04, 2017 11:18 pm


Indeed this guy is like some sort of provocateur.


Now that I have overcome the computer glitch that formerly preventing me from listening to the soundtrack, yes, I can now see what cassowary means. This guy is no harmless prankster - his language is aggressively obscene. You do not even need to be a Muslim to feel offended.

Did the US actually give this turkey political asylum? On what grounds?
Freedom of expression only counts when it is hard.

neverfail
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Re: Singapore establishment feels threatened by the exercise of democratic rights.

Post by neverfail » Tue Dec 05, 2017 10:04 pm

Milo wrote:
Tue Dec 05, 2017 10:02 am




Freedom of expression only counts when it is hard.
What does this have to do with the US granting him political asylum Milo? By "hard" do you mean outrageously irresponsible? Nothing "political " that I can see in this disgruntled youth's blatherings.

In any case, too much attention has been given in this discussion to this inconsequential nobody. I suspect that Cassowary chose to highlight this cyberspace emitter of hot air to lend the impression (guilt by association) that all of Singapore's dissidents are just like him. More significant is Jolovan Wham: mentioned in the opening introduction to this Asia Times article (my provided link above):

(quote)"After months of investigations, Singapore police finally dropped a bombshell at the end of November: social worker and activist Jolovan Wham would be charged for organizing public assemblies without a permit, vandalism and refusing to sign police statements.

Wham, who has spent his career as a social worker fighting for the rights of low-wage migrant workers, has been investigated multiple times by the police for various events deemed to be “illegal” under Singapore’s restrictive Public Order Act."
(unquote)

"...fighting for the rights of low-wage migrant workers"? That sounds to me like a very laudable project striven for by a very conscientious, highly responsible adult.

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